GAINSWave® Treatment in Clover, SC

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Few things are guaranteed in life, but there is one thing that you can count on for sure: as time goes on, your body is going to age. While most men in their late teens through their twenties might feel invincible, it's only a matter of time before age starts to play a role in everyday life. Injuries take longer to recover from, hangovers take longer to dissipate, aches and pains become a normal part of life, and intimate time with your partner can be compromised. If you have experienced any of the symptoms above, don't worry - it's completely normal to slow down as you get older.

The question is, what are you going to do about the aging process? For years, men were told to just "live with it," but in 2021, those days are over. The time to fight back is here, and there has never been a better opportunity to live your best life than now. Nobody understands the effects that aging can have on men but our team of professionals at Better Life do. That is why we invest all of our time developing innovative, effective men's health solutions: to give men a chance to change their future and live like they did while they were in their prime. If you're ready to take a stand against ED and live a more energetic, youthful life, know that you're not alone. At Better Life Carolinas, we are here to help by providing the most scientifically advanced treatments on the market today.

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GAINSWave® Treatment In Clover, SC

When it comes to men's health, the topic of sex can still feel taboo, especially when there are performance issues involved. At Better Life Carolinas, we have heard just about every story you can imagine regarding erectile dysfunction or ED. So if you're embarrassed and angry about your performance in the bedroom, we understand how you're feeling. In the past, men had to take strange drugs or sign off on expensive surgeries to help correct their ED, adding to their feelings of shame and hopelessness.

The good news? If you're a man dealing with ED, you don't have to settle for antiquated treatments like those referenced above. There's a new product on the block: a revolutionary, non-invasive treatment that is the first of it's kind. It's called GAINSWave®, and you can bet your bottom dollar that it isn't like anything else you have tried before.

Unlike most ED treatments, this unique approach does not require drugs or surgery. Instead, it relies on high-frequency acoustic waves to open the penis's existing blood vessels, encouraging the growth of new blood vessels while eliminating micro-plaque. To put it simply, GAINSWave® increases blood flow and gives you a chance to reclaim your libido and live life like a man in his prime.

GAINSWave® isn't a sketchy, quick-fix pill found behind the glass at a gas station. It is a comprehensive erectile dysfunction treatment with an incredible 76% success rate. With virtually no side effects, it's no wonder that men throughout the Carolinas and across the United States trust GAINSWave® to solve their ED and Peyronie's disease problems.

GainsWave Treatment Clover, SC  Emsella Chair Clover, SC

How GAINSWave® Works

It might sound like GAINSWave® is too good to be true, but the fact is this kind of erectile dysfunction treatment in Clover, SC uses scientifically-backed, time-tested technologies and applications to improve male sexual performance. Technically referred to as Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (LI-ESWT), our GAINSWave® procedure goes right to the crux of the issue. Low-intensity sound waves break up plaque formation in your penis while stimulating new blood vessel growth. These new blood vessels help get more blood to your penis, ultimately improving your ability to perform. This incredible treatment not only increases blood flow - it also causes new nerve tissues to grow, making your penis more sensitive and easily stimulated.

It all happens through a process called neurogenesis, which increases penis sensitivity. What sets GAINSWave® apart from others is the use of low-intensity sound waves to achieve increased blood flow and sensitivity. Because this procedure is completely non-invasive, you won't ever have to worry about expensive insurance claims or unsightly scarring. All you have to worry about is enjoying life like you used to, without having to undergo surgery or putting harmful substances in your body.

Here are some quick facts about Better Life Carolinas GAINSWave® treatments:

  • For most men, you can expect to have between 6 and 12 GAINSWave® sessions
  • Sessions typically take 15 to 20 minutes.
  • GAINSWave® works by releasing growth factors in your penis tissue, which generates new blood vessels.
  • GAINSWave® promotes healthy blood flow by breaking up plaque formation, giving men harder, stronger erections for longer periods of time.
  • GAINSWave® also activates dormant stem cells, which leads to new cell growth in men.

Hidden Risks of Prescription Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

If you have ever wondered why GAINSWave® treatments are so popular with men, the answer is simple. Prescription drugs meant to help ED often come with side effects that can diminish your peace of mind and day-to-day life. While some men swear by the "little blue pill," many guys aren't aware of the hidden risks associated with drugs like Viagra. The following ailments can happen both in the short term and long term:

  • Back Pain
  • Muscle Pain
  • Headaches
  • Vision Loss
  • Rashes
  • Respiratory Issues
  • Hearing Loss
  • Dizziness
  • Upset Stomach
  • Ringing in Ears
  • Fever
 VIVEVE Clover, SC

If you are having problems with erectile dysfunction, you should understand why it's happening. The primary cause of ED is associated with a lack of blood flow to the penis, making erections difficult to get and maintain. Rather than relying on a prescription pill for a quick fix, many men are using GAINSWave® treatment in Clover, SC for a natural solution with no ill side effects. ED doesn't have to be your "new normal," and neither does suffering from strange side effects from popping too many "little blue pills."

GAINSWave®, COVID-19, and ED

The global COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on the world. Over the last year, millions of Americans have had to change their lifestyles and alter daily routines to better protect themselves and their loved ones from the virus. While COVID-19 causes a litany of negative side effects, new research shows that men who contract the virus can triple their risk of developing erectile dysfunction. Because the human body is unfamiliar with this kind of virus, it responds by sending a large immune response. During this process, the body uses massive amounts of chemicals to eliminate the virus, causing horrible collateral damage in the form of cell destruction and inflammation.

 Shockwave Therapy Clover, SC

Contracting COVID-19 and suffering from ED at the same time might sound like a death sentence. However, if you are a man experiencing ED during or after contracting the COVID-19 virus, don't lose hope.

Clinical trials have shown that shockwave therapy, better known as GAINSWave®, has been shown to lower inflammation and boost vascularity by creating angiogenesis and improving endothelial function. Simply put, GAINSWave® treatments can help reverse symptoms of ED brought on by COVID-19. To learn more about how GAINSWave® can help you get back to a normal sex life after developing COVID-19, we recommend contacting our office today.

GAINSWave®: A Natural, Non-Invasive Treatment for Peyronie's Disease

Though Peyronie's Disease affects about 9% of men, it is a little-known disease that can cause physical and aesthetic issues. It is characterized by fibrous scar tissue, which forms underneath the surface of a man's penis. When this disease is left untreated or treated improperly, it can be very difficult for men to have a normal erection. This is because Peyronie's Disease can cause painful curvatures in the penis, making it nearly impossible for afflicted men to have sexual intercourse at all.

The cause of Peyronie's Disease is currently unknown. However, most cases stem from physical trauma like acute injuries after vigorous sex. Other causes include prostate surgery, autoimmune disorders, and family history. Unfortunately, traditional treatment options range from a "wait and see" approach to prescription drugs and even surgery.

Symptoms and signs of Peyronie's Disease include:

  • Erectile Dysfunction: Men with this disease may have problems achieving or maintaining erections.
  • Misshapen Penis: Some men with this disease suffer from a narrowing of the penis when erect, resembling an hourglass shape.
  • Notable Bend in Penis: One of the most common symptoms of Peyronie's Disease includes significant penis curvature, which is defined by a severe and unnatural bend.
  • Scar Tissue: A common symptom of this disease is bands of tissue or hard lumps underneath the skin of the penis.
  • Shortened Penis: Some men with this disease have reported a reduction in penis length.
  • Pain in Penis: Peyronie's has the potential to cause pain in a man's penis, regardless of whether he has an erection or not.
 Hormone Replacement Therapy Clover, SC

Fortunately, for men who are looking for a non-invasive, natural erectile dysfunction treatment in Clover, SC GAINSWave® is the answer. Using low-strength soundwaves or shockwaves, GAINSWave® treatment in Clover breaks down scar tissue affecting your penis, helps create new blood vessels, and opens up existing ones. As a result, blood flow is increased, which minimizes penis curvature and fixes the problems associated with erectile dysfunction.

P-Shot® Erectile Dysfunction Treatment in Clover, SC

Most guys will tell you that their penis is the most important part of their body. While that is not totally true from a physiological perspective, we get where they're coming from - after all, a man's penis plays a big role in his personal life and overall wellbeing. When a man has problems achieving and maintaining an erection, his quality of life can suffer dramatically, resulting in lower self-esteem and even depression. If you are a man and suffering from ED or Peyronie's Disease, you can rest easy knowing help is only a phone call away.

 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Clover, SC

In addition to GAINSWave® treatments, Better Life Carolinas also offers the Priapus Shot or P-Shot® for short. Originally used to treat wounds and sports injuries, our P-Shot® is an all-natural treatment that fortifies your body through cellular repair and rejuvenation. P-Shot® treatments have shown very promising results for men who have suffered from prostate cancer, enlarged prostates, the side effects of surgery, drug side effects from prescription pain killers, and even diabetes.

You might be asking yourself, "How does the P-Shot® work?"

This ED solution works by using platelet-rich plasma or PRP from your own body. The proteins and growth factors released by the large number of platelets activate your stem cells, which begins cellular regeneration and repair wherever the PRP are used in your body. Tissue repair in your penis is further aided by the formation of new blood vessels and collagen production.

In many cases, men who use the P-Shot® to correct erectile dysfunction or the effects of Peyronie's Disease can resume sexual activity a few hours after the treatment is applied.

Benefits of Better Life Carolinas' P-Shot® include:

  • Increased blood flow to the penis
  • Improved stamina during sexual activities
  • Improvement and possible resolution of penile curvature issues caused by Peyronie's Disease
  • Increased penis sensitivity
  • Improvements to penis girth and length

For more information about the Priapus Shot or to find out if this treatment is right for you, schedule your free consultation today.

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Latest News in Clover, SC

'It’s fun and crazy and exciting' | Downtown Clover poised for growth as town joins Main Street South Carolina program

The growth downtown is happening as a resource team from the Main Street South Carolina program is set to visit in March.CLOVER, S.C. — Downtown Clover is poised for big moves over the next three years as the city joins the Main Street South Carolina program at the aspiring level.The small town’s downtown district is filled with the familiar charm of historic buildings, with a mix of businesses ready to welcome peop...

The growth downtown is happening as a resource team from the Main Street South Carolina program is set to visit in March.

CLOVER, S.C. — Downtown Clover is poised for big moves over the next three years as the city joins the Main Street South Carolina program at the aspiring level.

The small town’s downtown district is filled with the familiar charm of historic buildings, with a mix of businesses ready to welcome people off the streets.

“I always say it’s like the little town of Mayberry, but just like a 2022 town of Mayberry, I guess you could say,” Alicia Griffith, one of the owners of Carolina Chocolate Company, said.

It’s part of the reason why Griffith opened a storefront a block off Main Street about six years ago.

The chocolate company has grown from a group of stay-at-home moms sticking on the labels to grocery store chains now selling the sweet treats.

“It’s fun and crazy and exciting,” Griffith said. "And it’s a lot of work.”

The shop only serves retail customers from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays, benefitting from the foot traffic as downtown Clover has grown over the last few years.

“A lot of younger families that are getting out and walking ... and you know, wanting to support small businesses and local, so it’s just been a really nice growth to sit and be a part of," Griffith said.

The shop opened in January 2021 as a new addition to Main Street.

“Saw that this place was available, and I had been kicking the tires on opening a bottle shop outside of Charlotte somewhere, so it all just fell into place,” Brent Voye, owner of The Vault Bottle Shop, said.

Voye transformed the former bank, complete with a vault for authenticity, into a new spot downtown to grab a beer or glass of wine in-house or on the go.

“You’ve got a couple new businesses,” Voye said. “I think two or three, as well as myself, that have all opened over the last year or so, so I don’t think it’s going to stop anytime soon.”

The growth downtown is happening as a resource team from the Main Street South Carolina program is set to visit in March.

According to its website, “Main Street South Carolina empowers residents with the knowledge, skills, tools and organizational structure necessary to revitalize their downtowns, neighborhood commercial districts and cities/towns into vibrant centers of commerce and community.”

Over the next three years, the program aims to revitalize the area, while preserving its history and the progress that’s already been made.

“What we want to do is celebrate those businesses and their investment in the downtown,” Jenny Boulware, state coordinator and manager of Main Street South Carolina, said. "But we also want to find opportunities to expand the work that they’re doing and find good neighbors to be a part of downtown’s growth.”

Boulware said the program will focus on design elements, identifying partners, promoting and branding the downtown area, and addressing economic development.

By the end of the three-year program, Boulware said she hopes to see downtown Clover 100% occupied, or close to it, and to have a renewed enthusiasm in the Main Street area.

“Downtowns are bringing back a lot of that community fabric of knowing your neighbors, supporting them, and knowing that you’re buying local,” Boulware added.

Duke Energy responds to power outage ‘blinks’ experienced by Clover residents

Most people expect a power outage during a storm or if a crash took down power lines, but these instances are random.CLOVER, S.C. (WBTV) - It is annoying whenever the power goes out. But in one area, the power is flickering—going off for 20 seconds, and sometimes even as long as 10 minutes, before coming back on.This has been happening for two months now and all the people WBTV talked to tell us no one has told them why.Most people expect a power outage during a storm or if a crash took down power lines, but these ...

Most people expect a power outage during a storm or if a crash took down power lines, but these instances are random.

CLOVER, S.C. (WBTV) - It is annoying whenever the power goes out. But in one area, the power is flickering—going off for 20 seconds, and sometimes even as long as 10 minutes, before coming back on.

This has been happening for two months now and all the people WBTV talked to tell us no one has told them why.

Most people expect a power outage during a storm or if a crash took down power lines, but these instances are random. And they are costing people hundreds of dollars in busted and fried electronics.

Jessica Loggins resets her oven clock to the correct time every time this happens. It has almost become a ritual in her house.

”This happens so much, I can’t remember all the times,” she says.

Loggins lives in one of the homes affected by the constant power outages or blinks, that have been happening from Lake Wylie down to York. This is a town-wide problem.

”I asked my husband, I said ‘is this not weird to you that the power keeps going out?’ Then I seen on Facebook that people were asking the same question,” Loggins says.

One of those people talking on Facebook is Kristine Guy.

”Half of my house lost power,” Guys says. “About two, three minutes later. The other half lost power. Couple seconds after that it all came back on.”

Guy and Loggins consider themselves lucky. While this has been more than an annoyance, they have had friends lose expensive appliances and electronics to the blinks. Loggins says she knows several people who have lost computers and more.

”A lady lost her cell phone during it yesterday,” she says. “One day it’s gonna happen when my phone is plugged in, and I can’t afford a new phone. And we don’t get any notification from Duke Energy when it happens.”

WBTV first reached out to York Electric Cooperative (YEC). The company sent out a Facebook post on Wednesday about this:

Many#YEC members in Western York County and the Lake Wylie area experienced a blink today. This momentary outage, along with several other recent blinks, have been because of issues with the Duke Energy transmission line serving these YEC substations.

We are diligently working with Duke Energy to determine the causes of these blinks and to mitigate any future issues. We understand these interruptions in service are frustrating to our members. Please know we are doing all we can to express the importance and urgency for which these problems should be resolved with Duke Energy.

We appreciate your continued patience and support as we work with Duke Energy to look out for you.

Porter Gable, the spokesperson for YEC, told WBTV that YEC is member-owned. That means members who pay into the cooperative are also the owners. While YEC provides the power to residents, it does not “own” the power. It gets that power from Duke Energy.

Gable says Duke Energy told them the blinks are due to transmission line problems. They have been happening since May, and affects seven of the company’s 27 substations. The blinks, according to their data, last two to three seconds on average.

Based on more data, the company says up to 16,000 members are affected at one time.

Gable says they are working with Duke Energy and stressing that these interruptions need to get done so their members can have the best electrical experience.

“We are always looking out for our members,” Gable says.

Since the people affected were not getting answers, I reached out to Duke Energy to find out why these power blinks keep happening. A spokesperson sent me an email saying on at least four occasions there have been snakes in the equipment. He says animal mitigation was installed.

But there is a deeper issue.

In an initial email, the spokesperson also said there was a “mechanical issue.”

WBTV followed up by asking what the mechanical issue was and when it could possibly be resolved. The spokesperson emailed back saying it’s an issue with the regulators that manage voltage levels, but they do not really know why it’s happening or when it could be fixed.

In a statement, the spokesperson says “We have been making reliability improvements in Clover County this year to stay ahead of potential issues and reduce outages for our customers.”

”It’s a little beyond frustrating at this point. At this point somebody needs to fix something,” Guy says.

WBTV found out that Duke Energy rerouted customer power this afternoon—a fix they hope could help these blinks. WBTV also asked what reimbursement looked like for anyone who lost electronics because of these blinks. Duke Energy has a claim report link people can find here.

If you are having issues with getting reimbursed you can contact WBTV.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Clover schools are offering free, low-cost meals to students. How to participate

The Clover School District will provide free and reduced-price meals to eligible students throughout the summer and the upcoming school year.The district started serving students, on July 1, under the federal National School Lunch and the School Breakfast programs, according to a news release. The programs will run through June 30, 2023.In June, President Joe Biden signed a law that extended some food assistance mea...

The Clover School District will provide free and reduced-price meals to eligible students throughout the summer and the upcoming school year.

The district started serving students, on July 1, under the federal National School Lunch and the School Breakfast programs, according to a news release. The programs will run through June 30, 2023.

In June, President Joe Biden signed a law that extended some food assistance measures, which have been utilized by millions of students nationwide, and will provide increased support to address food cost spikes amid a record high U.S. inflation rate.

In 2020, the National School Lunch Program provided low-cost and free lunches to nearly 22.6 million children each school day, according to the Agriculture Department.

Local school officials will determine if a child is eligible for either free or reduced-price meals based on household income, the release said. The programs’ income eligibility guidelines can be found on the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s website.

A household must provide the following information on the application:

▪ A Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families case number certifying the household is currently eligible for either programs and an adult household member signature or

▪ The names of all household members, the name and last four digits of the social security number of the adult household member signing the application form, current income for each household member and a signature of an adult household member certifying that the information provided is correct.

Foster children may also eligible for the meals regardless of household income, the release said.

If a household member becomes unemployed or the household’s size changes, the child’s guardian should contact the school to a file a meal application, the release said.

Several other school districts in and around York County, including York, Rock Hill and Chester County, have also been offering free meals throughout the summer.

Fort Mill teacher pay is going up again. But it’s another move that will raise taxes

Teacher pay will increase again in Fort Mill. That move by itself doesn’t require a tax increase, but a separate decision made Wednesday will.The Fort Mill School District board voted Wednesday to add contract days for special education teacher training, more preschool intervention for students in need and maintenance positions. The cost of more than $400,000 will come from a one mill tax rate increase and a transfer from contingency funds.A on...

Teacher pay will increase again in Fort Mill. That move by itself doesn’t require a tax increase, but a separate decision made Wednesday will.

The Fort Mill School District board voted Wednesday to add contract days for special education teacher training, more preschool intervention for students in need and maintenance positions. The cost of more than $400,000 will come from a one mill tax rate increase and a transfer from contingency funds.

A one mill increase raises more than $300,000 for the district.

“Even though it is only one mill, it is a tax increase,” said board Chairwoman Kristy Spears. “But it is specifically a tax increase not on houses. Not on primary residences.”

Businesses will pay the tax increase from Wednesday’s decision. So will rentals and property tax on cars and boats. Someone with a $30,000 vehicle would pay less than $5 more per year. Businesses would pay varying amounts based on their properties.

Board members say there were considerable funding challenges this year that make the increase necessary if they want to fund needs. Additional work with 4K students and training that could help in the high turnover area of special education instruction can have lasting impact for students and staff, board members said.

“Our primary focus should be, what can we do to improve the school district?” said board member Scott Frattaroli. “What is within our authority to get the needs for our students? This is our authority of what we are able to do to serve our students, to serve our staff, to serve our families. This is it.”

Board member Celia McCarter pointed to a state increase on the district share of employee health insurance from its typical 3% a year to 18% this year. That cost the district $1.2 million. Fort Mill also doesn’t get the same state funding other areas do, based on demographics.

“This is the only funding mechanism that we have at our discretion to make a difference in education for Fort Mill students,” board member Michele Branning said of the tax increase. “I think that it is worth the trade-off.”

The tax decision came right after the board approved yet another pay increase for teachers.

“Any day we can increase the pay for our teachers is a great day,” said board member Wayne Bouldin.

In June the board approved $2,000 increases in annual teacher pay. New state funding, updated estimates from the June tax reports in York County, interest on investment allocations and more combined with contingency money will allow another $300 per teacher.

Those increases would bring the starting teacher salary to $43,700, highest among nearby districts, according to Leanne Lordo, assistant superintendent and district CFO.

That distinction is significant.

“We’re recruiting from all over the country now,” said superintendent Chuck Epps. “And you don’t know much about Fort Mill or Clover or York. So when you look at that and you add the $300 and you put us back at No. 1 in the region, you get their attention right off the bat. It’s a recruitment issue for us.”

A new state requirement that districts start at $40,000 or more means state money was provided to districts that weren’t at that level. Fort Mill didn’t get that additional money.

“The gap is going to become smaller and smaller across districts as far as teacher pay, which is going to make it even harder to recruit new teachers from out of state who really don’t know that much about South Carolina and specifically our area,” Lordo said.

McCarter said increased teacher pay statewide is both a positive step and a challenge.

“I’m incredibly encouraged that it looks like our surrounding districts are able and putting more money into paying teachers,” McCarter said. “We have learned and we know how important and valuable teachers are, and how hard they work. And I believe we need to, as a culture and as a society, start emphasizing that better by paying them that way.”

Yet, she said, pay increases prove a challenge in Fort Mill if the district wants to remain on top.

“We need to pay the best, recruit the best and keep the best,” McCarter said.

In Fort Mill, it’s the constant need for more teachers that makes higher pay difficult. The district typically needs to add double-digit new positions a year, and often has considerable increases with the opening of a new school. Already there’s preliminary work toward opening a new elementary and middle school.

“We are certainly still challenged with the fact that we are the fastest growing district in South Carolina,” Lordo said. “We are having to still hire probably, proportionately, the highest number of new teachers a year to accommodate our growth and our state funding is not at the same level as some of our surrounding districts.”

All this is happening while Fort Mill and other districts face a dwindling pool of candidate teachers.

“What we have seen happening in the education field across the state and the nation, as far as teacher recruitment and retention, this has become a vital consideration in maintaining our teacher salaries at the highest level that we can fund,” Lordo said.

The latest $300 increase for teachers comes without its own tax hike. Board members say they’d like to pay teachers more, but have to balance that desire with funding limitations.

“To me it’s a balance because it’s not only our staff,” Epps said. “It’s also the public and the tax money.”

This story was originally published July 21, 2022 2:55 PM.

Schools in the Rock Hill region shift to eLearning days due icy conditions on Tuesday.

With sub-freezing temperatures expected Monday night and roads wet after having been covered Sunday with snow and ice, school systems are making decisions about how they will proceed this week.Traditionally, if roads weren’t deemed safe due to winter weather, students didn’t go to school. When COVID-19 hit, districts across the country invented and introduced a range of virtual school options.This is what The Herald now knows about school plans this week in this region.A release from the Rock Hill School Dist...

With sub-freezing temperatures expected Monday night and roads wet after having been covered Sunday with snow and ice, school systems are making decisions about how they will proceed this week.

Traditionally, if roads weren’t deemed safe due to winter weather, students didn’t go to school. When COVID-19 hit, districts across the country invented and introduced a range of virtual school options.

This is what The Herald now knows about school plans this week in this region.

A release from the Rock Hill School District at midday Monday said “Rock Hill Schools will engage with eLearning Tuesday due to the forecast of refreezing ice that will make it unsafe to open our buildings.

“All district buildings and schools will be closed to our team, this includes facilities and custodians.”

The district, through the state, has the flexibility to use five eLearning days each year for inclement weather. That means in the event of ice, snow or torrentially terrible wind, the district would use an “eLearning day,” which, in other words, is a day when students receive work through an online platform and must complete it within a certain time.

“If for some reason we run out of eLearning days, we would use the weather days (snow days) and then have to make them up as dictated by our calendar make-up days,” said Lindsay Machak spokesperson for the school system.

Clover and York districts are scheduled to be off Tuesday.

The Clover School District board voted last week during a special meeting to move the originally scheduled teacher workday from March 14 to Jan. 18. The calendar change was made because a significant number of staff are out as a result of COVID-19, according to the district’s website.

Clover School District spokesperson Bryan Dillon told The Herald in an email that the district’s calendar has three days built in to be used as bad weather make-up days, which is required by the state. The district also has the ability to call an “eLearning day” in the case of inclement weather, he said.

Since the district has the ability to plan in advance, the district could call an “eLearning day” on Wednesday if the weather requires it, Dillon said.

“CSD will be closely monitoring the amount of weather we receive and its impact on our roads,” he said.

York School District students also are scheduled to be off Tuesday. York School District spokesperson Tim Cooper told The Herald that the district is monitoring the weather and has started considering its options.

The district’s board voted Thursday during an emergency meeting to amend its calendar, moving the originally scheduled teacher workday on Feb. 18 to Jan. 18, according to the agenda. The change was made to “assist with staff and student COVID-19 numbers that are reaching a critical point,” according to a release from the district.

The Chester County School District has been advised by Emergency Management that due to Sunday’s winter storm, road conditions will not be safe on Tuesday morning, Chester County School District spokesman Chris Christoff said in a statement.

Tuesday will therefore be a remote learning day, Christoff said.

Students will work independently on assignments, but teachers will advise students of all assignments for the day and will be available during normal school hours via email to provide support as needed.

As of right now, the school at CCSD will return to normal operations on Wednesday, January 19, 2022, Christoff said.

The Lancaster County School District also will cancel school Tuesday, according to a post on their Facebook page.

“Please look for more information from your child’s school and individual teacher for what this means for your student,” officials wrote in the post. “If you should have a power or internet outage, please know that we will work with your student to address missed assignments.”

Due to the possibility for unsafe traveling conditions following the winter storm this weekend, all Fort Mill schools will transition to eLearning for Tuesday, a statement from the district said.

All afterschool activities and programs are canceled.

Schools will communicate more information for how the instructional day will operate, the statement said.

Because Fort Mill will have an eLearning day rather than cancel school, there will not a need for a make-up day later this year.

This story was originally published January 14, 2022 12:47 PM.

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