GAINSWave® Treatment in Folly Beach, SC

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Few things are guaranteed in life, but there is one thing that you can count on for sure: as time goes on, your body is going to age. While most men in their late teens through their twenties might feel invincible, it's only a matter of time before age starts to play a role in everyday life. Injuries take longer to recover from, hangovers take longer to dissipate, aches and pains become a normal part of life, and intimate time with your partner can be compromised. If you have experienced any of the symptoms above, don't worry - it's completely normal to slow down as you get older.

The question is, what are you going to do about the aging process? For years, men were told to just "live with it," but in 2021, those days are over. The time to fight back is here, and there has never been a better opportunity to live your best life than now. Nobody understands the effects that aging can have on men but our team of professionals at Better Life do. That is why we invest all of our time developing innovative, effective men's health solutions: to give men a chance to change their future and live like they did while they were in their prime. If you're ready to take a stand against ED and live a more energetic, youthful life, know that you're not alone. At Better Life Carolinas, we are here to help by providing the most scientifically advanced treatments on the market today.

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GAINSWave® Treatment In Folly Beach, SC

When it comes to men's health, the topic of sex can still feel taboo, especially when there are performance issues involved. At Better Life Carolinas, we have heard just about every story you can imagine regarding erectile dysfunction or ED. So if you're embarrassed and angry about your performance in the bedroom, we understand how you're feeling. In the past, men had to take strange drugs or sign off on expensive surgeries to help correct their ED, adding to their feelings of shame and hopelessness.

The good news? If you're a man dealing with ED, you don't have to settle for antiquated treatments like those referenced above. There's a new product on the block: a revolutionary, non-invasive treatment that is the first of it's kind. It's called GAINSWave®, and you can bet your bottom dollar that it isn't like anything else you have tried before.

Unlike most ED treatments, this unique approach does not require drugs or surgery. Instead, it relies on high-frequency acoustic waves to open the penis's existing blood vessels, encouraging the growth of new blood vessels while eliminating micro-plaque. To put it simply, GAINSWave® increases blood flow and gives you a chance to reclaim your libido and live life like a man in his prime.

GAINSWave® isn't a sketchy, quick-fix pill found behind the glass at a gas station. It is a comprehensive erectile dysfunction treatment with an incredible 76% success rate. With virtually no side effects, it's no wonder that men throughout the Carolinas and across the United States trust GAINSWave® to solve their ED and Peyronie's disease problems.

GainsWave Treatment Folly Beach, SC  Emsella Chair Folly Beach, SC

How GAINSWave® Works

It might sound like GAINSWave® is too good to be true, but the fact is this kind of erectile dysfunction treatment in Folly Beach, SC uses scientifically-backed, time-tested technologies and applications to improve male sexual performance. Technically referred to as Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (LI-ESWT), our GAINSWave® procedure goes right to the crux of the issue. Low-intensity sound waves break up plaque formation in your penis while stimulating new blood vessel growth. These new blood vessels help get more blood to your penis, ultimately improving your ability to perform. This incredible treatment not only increases blood flow - it also causes new nerve tissues to grow, making your penis more sensitive and easily stimulated.

It all happens through a process called neurogenesis, which increases penis sensitivity. What sets GAINSWave® apart from others is the use of low-intensity sound waves to achieve increased blood flow and sensitivity. Because this procedure is completely non-invasive, you won't ever have to worry about expensive insurance claims or unsightly scarring. All you have to worry about is enjoying life like you used to, without having to undergo surgery or putting harmful substances in your body.

Here are some quick facts about Better Life Carolinas GAINSWave® treatments:

  • For most men, you can expect to have between 6 and 12 GAINSWave® sessions
  • Sessions typically take 15 to 20 minutes.
  • GAINSWave® works by releasing growth factors in your penis tissue, which generates new blood vessels.
  • GAINSWave® promotes healthy blood flow by breaking up plaque formation, giving men harder, stronger erections for longer periods of time.
  • GAINSWave® also activates dormant stem cells, which leads to new cell growth in men.

Hidden Risks of Prescription Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

If you have ever wondered why GAINSWave® treatments are so popular with men, the answer is simple. Prescription drugs meant to help ED often come with side effects that can diminish your peace of mind and day-to-day life. While some men swear by the "little blue pill," many guys aren't aware of the hidden risks associated with drugs like Viagra. The following ailments can happen both in the short term and long term:

  • Back Pain
  • Muscle Pain
  • Headaches
  • Vision Loss
  • Rashes
  • Respiratory Issues
  • Hearing Loss
  • Dizziness
  • Upset Stomach
  • Ringing in Ears
  • Fever
 VIVEVE Folly Beach, SC

If you are having problems with erectile dysfunction, you should understand why it's happening. The primary cause of ED is associated with a lack of blood flow to the penis, making erections difficult to get and maintain. Rather than relying on a prescription pill for a quick fix, many men are using GAINSWave® treatment in Folly Beach, SC for a natural solution with no ill side effects. ED doesn't have to be your "new normal," and neither does suffering from strange side effects from popping too many "little blue pills."

GAINSWave®, COVID-19, and ED

The global COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on the world. Over the last year, millions of Americans have had to change their lifestyles and alter daily routines to better protect themselves and their loved ones from the virus. While COVID-19 causes a litany of negative side effects, new research shows that men who contract the virus can triple their risk of developing erectile dysfunction. Because the human body is unfamiliar with this kind of virus, it responds by sending a large immune response. During this process, the body uses massive amounts of chemicals to eliminate the virus, causing horrible collateral damage in the form of cell destruction and inflammation.

 Shockwave Therapy Folly Beach, SC

Contracting COVID-19 and suffering from ED at the same time might sound like a death sentence. However, if you are a man experiencing ED during or after contracting the COVID-19 virus, don't lose hope.

Clinical trials have shown that shockwave therapy, better known as GAINSWave®, has been shown to lower inflammation and boost vascularity by creating angiogenesis and improving endothelial function. Simply put, GAINSWave® treatments can help reverse symptoms of ED brought on by COVID-19. To learn more about how GAINSWave® can help you get back to a normal sex life after developing COVID-19, we recommend contacting our office today.

GAINSWave®: A Natural, Non-Invasive Treatment for Peyronie's Disease

Though Peyronie's Disease affects about 9% of men, it is a little-known disease that can cause physical and aesthetic issues. It is characterized by fibrous scar tissue, which forms underneath the surface of a man's penis. When this disease is left untreated or treated improperly, it can be very difficult for men to have a normal erection. This is because Peyronie's Disease can cause painful curvatures in the penis, making it nearly impossible for afflicted men to have sexual intercourse at all.

The cause of Peyronie's Disease is currently unknown. However, most cases stem from physical trauma like acute injuries after vigorous sex. Other causes include prostate surgery, autoimmune disorders, and family history. Unfortunately, traditional treatment options range from a "wait and see" approach to prescription drugs and even surgery.

Symptoms and signs of Peyronie's Disease include:

  • Erectile Dysfunction: Men with this disease may have problems achieving or maintaining erections.
  • Misshapen Penis: Some men with this disease suffer from a narrowing of the penis when erect, resembling an hourglass shape.
  • Notable Bend in Penis: One of the most common symptoms of Peyronie's Disease includes significant penis curvature, which is defined by a severe and unnatural bend.
  • Scar Tissue: A common symptom of this disease is bands of tissue or hard lumps underneath the skin of the penis.
  • Shortened Penis: Some men with this disease have reported a reduction in penis length.
  • Pain in Penis: Peyronie's has the potential to cause pain in a man's penis, regardless of whether he has an erection or not.
 Hormone Replacement Therapy Folly Beach, SC

Fortunately, for men who are looking for a non-invasive, natural erectile dysfunction treatment in Folly Beach, SC GAINSWave® is the answer. Using low-strength soundwaves or shockwaves, GAINSWave® treatment in Folly Beach breaks down scar tissue affecting your penis, helps create new blood vessels, and opens up existing ones. As a result, blood flow is increased, which minimizes penis curvature and fixes the problems associated with erectile dysfunction.

P-Shot® Erectile Dysfunction Treatment in Folly Beach, SC

Most guys will tell you that their penis is the most important part of their body. While that is not totally true from a physiological perspective, we get where they're coming from - after all, a man's penis plays a big role in his personal life and overall wellbeing. When a man has problems achieving and maintaining an erection, his quality of life can suffer dramatically, resulting in lower self-esteem and even depression. If you are a man and suffering from ED or Peyronie's Disease, you can rest easy knowing help is only a phone call away.

 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Folly Beach, SC

In addition to GAINSWave® treatments, Better Life Carolinas also offers the Priapus Shot or P-Shot® for short. Originally used to treat wounds and sports injuries, our P-Shot® is an all-natural treatment that fortifies your body through cellular repair and rejuvenation. P-Shot® treatments have shown very promising results for men who have suffered from prostate cancer, enlarged prostates, the side effects of surgery, drug side effects from prescription pain killers, and even diabetes.

You might be asking yourself, "How does the P-Shot® work?"

This ED solution works by using platelet-rich plasma or PRP from your own body. The proteins and growth factors released by the large number of platelets activate your stem cells, which begins cellular regeneration and repair wherever the PRP are used in your body. Tissue repair in your penis is further aided by the formation of new blood vessels and collagen production.

In many cases, men who use the P-Shot® to correct erectile dysfunction or the effects of Peyronie's Disease can resume sexual activity a few hours after the treatment is applied.

Benefits of Better Life Carolinas' P-Shot® include:

  • Increased blood flow to the penis
  • Improved stamina during sexual activities
  • Improvement and possible resolution of penile curvature issues caused by Peyronie's Disease
  • Increased penis sensitivity
  • Improvements to penis girth and length

For more information about the Priapus Shot or to find out if this treatment is right for you, schedule your free consultation today.

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Latest News in Folly Beach, SC

Smart reefs being placed off Charleston will record data to aid coastal flooding, erosion planning

STONO INLET — New technology to be installed near an artificial reef off Charleston this weekend will provide scientists and mariners with real-time data on waves, wind direction and water temperature.The Smart Reef installation is the culmination of the monthlong SC7 Expedition meant to get people outdoors statewide from the mountains to the sea.On July 30, a S.C. Department of Natural Resources vessel will carry 85-pound blocks into the ocean. Then a dive team led by retired Special Forces operators, will place the bloc...

STONO INLET — New technology to be installed near an artificial reef off Charleston this weekend will provide scientists and mariners with real-time data on waves, wind direction and water temperature.

The Smart Reef installation is the culmination of the monthlong SC7 Expedition meant to get people outdoors statewide from the mountains to the sea.

On July 30, a S.C. Department of Natural Resources vessel will carry 85-pound blocks into the ocean. Then a dive team led by retired Special Forces operators, will place the blocks about 5 miles off Stono Inlet, the waterway between Kiawah Island and Folly Beach where the Stono River reaches the ocean.

The reef blocks will sit near one of the Charleston area’s most popular artificial reefs.

Once the structure is assembled, a buoy with satellite communication capabilities will be installed to record wave, water temperature and wind data.

The idea to install the new technology offshore stems from goals of the S.C. Floodwater Commission.

There are more than 40 artificial reefs along the state’s coast including old vehicles, boats and bridges, among other things. Marine animals flock to the structures for shelter, food and spawning.

“If we build artificial reefs out there, they’re going to modify waves and currents and things like that,” said Paul Gayes, a marine science and geology professor at Coastal Carolina University.

So while the structures form these biological functions “why wouldn’t it be helpful to institute all these sensors in it to better feed the model system,” Gayes said.

This weekend’s installation is important because, although the Atlantic Ocean has major influence on South Carolina, there is limited scientific data about the coastal ocean area, such as water quality and temperature.

Gayes said this is partially because it’s so tough to work the area.

He is the scientific leader for the SC7 Smart Reef installation. The university has also spearheaded dives to place modular reef sections off Hilton Head Island and North Myrtle Beach.

“We’re not only building the reefs, which is where all marine life starts, but we’re putting on technology that will allow us to have better capabilities for coastal erosion and other issues associated with sea level rise,” said Tom Mullikin, leader of the SC7 Expedition.

The smart reefs in South Carolina will tie into a broader network along the East Coast.

Gayes said the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has a system of about 100 buoys throughout the country, but they are widely spaced.

NOAA’s buoys closest to Charleston are about 40 miles south of Edisto Island. The next closest ones are near Cape Fear in North Carolina or Jacksonville, Fla., Gayes said.

These added Smart Reefs — designed to emulate the existing live bottoms — will help better inform for weather modeling and forecasting. Local mariners and others who are interested will be able to access the recorded data in real time online to get a better sense of what the water conditions are like before going out.

“As the state works to increase resilience to extreme weather events, quality data is essential in the development of predictive modeling and planning,” said Ben Duncan, chief resilience officer at the S.C. Office of Resilience.

He said understanding how artificial reefs can be used to reduce storm surge, among other things, will be crucial as coastal communities prepare for rising sea levels and potential increased tropical activity.

3 local waterways with high levels of reported bacteria

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With heat index values expected to boost feels-like temperatures into the mid-100s this weekend, Lowcountry residents and visitors will no doubt be searching for a way to cool off.And while a dip in one of the area’s many swimming holes or the Charleston harbor may seem like the perfect idea, there are a few local waterways with high levels of bacteria making them an...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD)- With heat index values expected to boost feels-like temperatures into the mid-100s this weekend, Lowcountry residents and visitors will no doubt be searching for a way to cool off.

And while a dip in one of the area’s many swimming holes or the Charleston harbor may seem like the perfect idea, there are a few local waterways with high levels of bacteria making them an unsafe option.

Out of 20 tested sites, Charleston Waterkeeper reported high levels of Enterococcus bacteria at 4 sites– Hendricks Park, upper Ellis Creek, and two portions of Shem Creek.

Bacteria results over 104 MPN/100 mL mean water quality is poor and with more rain in the area this week, there are still high results lingering.

“When bacteria levels are high, that means pathogens may also be present. We’re talking about things like Cholera, Tuberculosis, Staph, Vibrio, some really nasty things that can get you sick. So its important that you pay attention to the data,” said Andrew Wunderley, the Executive Director of Charleston Waterkeeper.

Looking to the North, bacteria levels in the Ashley River have come down, returning that spot to GREEN status. Unfortunately, Hendricks Park remains RED despite numbers coming down from last week, meaning swimming and other water-based activities should be avoided in Filbin Creek.

Boaters and swimmers in the Charleston Harbor should have no worries as all points of the Harbor from Melton Demetre Park to Patriots Point are clear.

As expected, things look a little dicier in Mount Pleasant. There’s no trouble in the lower reaches at Shem Creek Park, but the boat landing and residential portions are not a safe option this week. The Cove and Hobcaw Creek both look good to go, though!

Mixed news continues as we head to James Island where Ellis Creek is RED in the upper reaches, but GREEN in the lower reaches. All GREENS for the rest of the island at Sol Legare, Clark Sound, and the Folly River.

Want to launch the boat from somewhere new this weekend? Wappoo Cut Boat Ramp is a great option as it shows no signs of high bacteria levels.

No signs of trouble at the beaches either where Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island are both GREEN according to the latest DHEC data. No data was collected for Folly Beach, Kiawah Island, or Seabrook Island this week.

You can explore the map here.

Folly Beach, South Carolina

The largest settlement on Folly Island, a barrier island in South Carolina's Charleston County, the public city of Folly Beach, is a popular surfing and seaside hotspot situated about 18 km south of Charleston. With a total area of 48.9 square km and a modestly small population of just over 2,000, Folly Beach is an exciting be...

The largest settlement on Folly Island, a barrier island in South Carolina's Charleston County, the public city of Folly Beach, is a popular surfing and seaside hotspot situated about 18 km south of Charleston. With a total area of 48.9 square km and a modestly small population of just over 2,000, Folly Beach is an exciting beach community with plenty of memories ready to be made.

Climate Of Folly Beach

Winters in Folly Beach are short and cool, while summers are often oppressively hot; from May to September, the average daily temperatures reach 29°C, with July as the hottest month and highs of 32°C. Winters typically lasts from December to March, and the temperature climbs no higher than 17°C on average. January is considered the coldest month, with lows of 6°C. The wet season typically lasts from June to September, with a 35% chance of rainfall on any given day. Statistically, August is the wettest month, with an average of 15 days out of 31 with at least 1mm of precipitation, while November is the driest, with only six days on average recording any rain. Due to its coastal location on the Atlantic Ocean, Folly Beach and Island often face the effects of tropical storms and hurricanes; amongst the notable storms to hit the area was Hurricane Hugo in 1989, which destroyed up to 80% of the settlement.

History Of Folly Beach And Island

From the Old English word "Folly," an area with undergrowth and densely packed forestation, the history of Folly Island date back to the 17th century. In 1696, the British Monarch William III endowed the area to a settler named William Rivers. Throughout the years, ownership of the Island and its eventual largest settlement, Folly Beach, passed to several different proprietors. While it was officially a British and later American possession following the Revolutionary War (1775-1783), the indigenous Bohicket Tribe continued to populate the area, often with an uneasy relationship with the European colonizers. Because of its location on South Carolina's Atlantic coast, in the 18th and 19th centuries, numerous shipwreck survivors found themselves temporarily lodged in the town and Island. Among these were passengers of the Amelia in 1832. But Folly Beach and Island began its actual industrialization during the American Civil War when Federal Troops were stationed there. Supply depots, forts, roads, and other strategic posts were constructed during this period, and the beach city and its surrounding foliage served as an essential site in the battle to retake Fort Sumter. Following the Civil War, and as part of the Federal Government's social and economic program of Reconstruction, Folly Beach and Island grew as a seaside retreat area; through the rest of the 19th century and into the 20th century. Several cottages, boardwalks, piers, small businesses, and even amusement park rides began to fill the area. Music-halls and clubs grew rapidly, particularly in the immediate post World War II period, and big bands like Glenn Miller's entertained residents and tourists alike. Folly Beach is furthermore forever tied to a classic of modern American music and composer, George Gershwin. While vacationing on the Island and Beach in the summer of 1934, the composer and pianist completed his famed opera Porgy and Bess, which is set in the South Carolina town of Charleston.

Attractions In Folly Beach

Referred by locals as "The Edge of America," Folly Beach houses numerous surfing spots, which see hundreds of enthusiasts descend into town; amongst the most popular of these spots are Washout, Folly Beach Pier, and 10th Street. Along with these sites, tourists and surfers can find great waves on the water and even better hospitality on land. An eclectic range of restaurants, gift shops, bars, and offices color the town's scenery, while such landmarks as the Atlantic Pavilion and Oceanfront Hotel provide comfortable lodging and entertainment. A glimpse of the North Atlantic right whales can occasionally be seen during their respective migration seasons. These enormous creatures migrate along the coast of Folly Island, often leaving whale watchers with a spectacular exhibition of nature in all its wonder.

Just off the coast of Folly Beach, visitors can also marvel at a human wonder and the famed Morris Island Lighthouse. First constructed in 1872, the Lighthouse is noted for its slight lean, directly resulting from an earthquake in 1886.

The historically-minded tourist will surely love to take a 30-minute drive and visit Fort Sumter, the site of the attack that began the Civil War in 1861. This living museum is an eternal reminder of the tremendous toll the Civil War took on American society and its enduring presence in political and popular culture.

These and a plethora of other local museums and parks round out any visit to Folly Beach and Island; whether it is to enjoy the beach life and surfing, take in some great live music performances, or step into a bit of American history, any stopover at this unique Island and City will be one to surely write about.

Looking back at the food and places we miss

Many Charleston restaurants have come and gone over the past 25 years since City Paper first hit the stands. From former beloved places like Martha Lou’s soul food or Southern bistro Carolina’s to newer establishments like Chinese fusion Jackrabbit Filly or recently opened new American Vern’s, the city’s foodscape is ever-changing.While many places have shuttered their doors, the dishes will always be remembered. City Paper spoke with some of the city’s oldest and newest culinary guards ...

Many Charleston restaurants have come and gone over the past 25 years since City Paper first hit the stands. From former beloved places like Martha Lou’s soul food or Southern bistro Carolina’s to newer establishments like Chinese fusion Jackrabbit Filly or recently opened new American Vern’s, the city’s foodscape is ever-changing.

While many places have shuttered their doors, the dishes will always be remembered. City Paper spoke with some of the city’s oldest and newest culinary guards to look back at the places they miss most.

John Keener, owner of Charleston Crab House, wishes more restaurants served deviled crab. “[It’s] crab meat with spices and stuffing in it,” he said. “Every seafood restaurant 20-30 years ago had deviled crab. Nobody carries it now.”

Keener’s once-favorite place to find this dish? Former Shem Creek establishment The Trawler. “It was the original seafood place,” he said. “They had a pirate, nautical theme and it was just fun to take kids there.”

Some former employees at now-closed establishments, like Carolina’s and McCrady’s, are restaurateurs themselves these days. Steve Palmer, managing partner of the Indigo Road Hospitality Group, worked at former Carolina’s as a server in the ’90s. Now, Palmer’s hospitality group owns several establishments in Charleston including Brasserie la Banque, Indaco, Maya and Oak Steakhouse, and in other cities like Charlotte and Atlanta.

Though Palmer has a handful of his own restaurants now, there are some places and dishes he misses. “There was a restaurant on Folly Beach called Fire Bistro. And there was a French guy (his name escapes me). [He had] a little 50-seat place and he only made it a couple of years, but the food was unbelievably good.”

Palmer also noted that the Old Post Office Restaurant on Edisto Island had “the best grits in the Lowcountry at the time” when Phillip Barden was the chef in the ’90s.

Bethany and Dano Heinze, owners of the newly opened Vern’s on Bogard Street, met while working at Sean Brock’s former fine dining spot McCrady’s. Though the couple had lived in Charleston since the early aughts, they moved away from 2016-2021. In just the five years they were gone, some of their favorite frequented places shuttered their doors, the couple said.

“First and foremost, Martha Lou’s,” Dano said of establishments he misses most. “We used to love the fried chicken, lima beans and collard greens. And it [was] just such a cool, homey restaurant. It’s the epitome of a mom and pop restaurant.”

Bethany lamented the loss of Two Boroughs Larder, the former new American restaurant that opened on Coming Street in 2011, but closed in 2016. “I thought that they were kind of ahead of their time with the innovation and the food but in a really casual neighborhood.”

Two Boroughs Larder initially started as a sandwich shop by Josh and Heather Keeler, but soon turned into a beloved all-day cafe, serving noodle bowls, breakfast sandwiches and small plates that earned Josh three James Beard Foundation Award nominations for Best Southeast Chef.

Of course, the couple couldn’t forget McCrady’s, where Dano was chef de cuisine and Bethany the bar manager.

“It was a truly inspiring establishment for many, many people and just the talent that place bred and cultivated was a real staple in the city,” Bethany said.

Owner and chef of Malika Chai Canteen Maryam Ghaznavi said she misses Jestine’s Kitchen because of its history in the city.

“Jestine’s was a landmark and possibly introduced many visitors to Southern soul food,” Ghaznavi said. “Raheel and I took my in-laws to Jestine’s before Covid and they still remember that visit!”

Ghaznavi and her husband Raheel Gauba have since taken over space for their long-awaited Ma’am Saab which is slated to be opened sometine in the early fall.

And like the Heinze’s memories of McGrady’s, Ghaznavi and Gauba can’t forget a place that helped shape what they’ve become: Workshop.

“Workshop was the most unique F&B concept in the city and it was sad to see it close when it did,” Ghaznavi said. “My kids were a huge fan of Chuck & Patty’s burgers and Ma’am Saab made some of our most treasured memories at the Workshop.”

Others like chef Nico Romo of NICO, Bistronomy and Laura long for former quick, casual dining spots. “I really miss Papa ZuZu’s in Mount Pleasant,” Romo said. “It was one of our favorite lunch spots for us at NICO. We went there at least once a week. The gyro was just awesome.”

Papa ZuZu’s was a former Greek restaurant just down the road from NICO that offered other Greek staples like gazpacho, baba ghanouj, various pita wraps and baklava. It has since closed down, but according to its Instagram page, is “in preparation to open in a new location.”

For Shuai Wang of Jackrabbit Filly, bygone sandwich shops top his list of places he misses.

“I miss everything about Artisan Meat Share,” Wang said of the former Spring Street sandwich shop that cured its own meats before closing in 2017. “There was a ham and peanut kind of sandwich and a really delicious parmesan tripe sandwich. It was just the whole concept of it that was really fun and I really liked it there.”

Butcher & Bee is still open at 1085 Morrison Drive, but Wang misses “the old Butcher & Bee,” located where Neon Tiger is now. The original Butcher & Bee only served lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and late night munchies from 11 p.m.-3 a.m., Wang recounted. And the menu was much different then the current farm-fresh dishes coming out of its kitchen today. The “old” Butcher & Bee served unique sandwiches and turned into a late-night hang out because of its bring-your-own-beer (or wine) policy.

What he misses most from Butcher & Bee, though, is the beef tongue sandwich. “I can’t remember exactly what was on it, but I remember I loved everything [about] it.”

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Folly Beach considering rezoning changes to prevent overdevelopment in the area

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — It’s no secret that Folly Beach is quickly becoming one of the most popular places to move t...

FOLLY BEACH, S.C. (WCIV) — It’s no secret that Folly Beach is quickly becoming one of the most popular places to move to in the Lowcountry. But town officials are worried that overdevelopment will soon take over the identity of the town.

In an effort to stop this overdevelopment, City Council will look Tuesday night to change those zoning requirements to “keep the character” of Center Street, and the surrounding community, intact.

The first set of changes to zoning requirements fall under what city officials call the “Center Street Overlay Zone.”

The changes include having new developments start at ground level instead of elevated, as well as a two-story maximum or 34-foot height cap on new buildings. This requirement includes rooftop bars or seating areas as one of the two levels.

If approved, the rezoning will also prevent any private residential properties from being built on Center Street, something officials say is important to keeping the Center Street area accessible for residents.

“We want to make sure that whatever goes up on those lines, here on our Main Street, kind of fit the character of what is already here. We've seen in the commercial district in general, we've seen some pretty massive, relatively speaking, massive buildings go up around Center Street and we want to make sure that on Center Street, that scale and massing is kept down to match what's here,” City Administrator Aaron Pope said.

In addition to those restrictions, new developments will be encouraged to put public outdoor seating near the sidewalk on Center Street.

But Center Street isn’t the only area Folly officials are looking to rezone. Another rezoning change involves the surrounding residential area of Center Street and downtown commercial district.

The changes could affect some residents' ability to make improvements to their existing properties.

The biggest change involves how much of the landowners can build out to. The new zoning changes in the area will require all properties to have at least 10 feet of space between their building and the street.

Residents and Business owners in the area expressed concern about their ability to develop their homes in a public hearing last week, but overall, many people say it’s a step that needs to be taken.

“From a residential standpoint, I think it's more pleasing and more pleasant to have more room around the properties, more green space and less of the shoulder or to show or canyon effect of the tall buildings,” Folly Beach resident Joe Vandiver said.

In addition to the land space restrictions, the rezoning changes would restrict multi-family complexes from being built in the downtown area.

Pope cites the building of the big complexes near the post office off of Center Street as a prime example of what could turn into overdevelopment, which could run out local businesses.

“With property values going the way they are, it's only a matter of time before the land becomes valuable enough or the land becomes so valuable that in order to get things out of it, you have to build the biggest thing you can or another Hurricane Hugo is going to come through and destroy half the buildings in the commercial district. And when people rebuild, they max out the zoning. We want to make sure the max zoning results in smaller more compatible buildings,” Pope said.

The zoning changes will take place in the surrounding area of center street down to around Bert's Market.

If approved, officials did say any property owners who have concerns of these changes can request a hearing with the board of zoning appeals as some exceptions can be made.

City Council will have the first reading of these rezoning changes at the meeting at 6:30 p.m.

A final decision will not be voted on until the second reading in June.

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