GAINSWave® Treatment in Lake Wylie, SC

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Few things are guaranteed in life, but there is one thing that you can count on for sure: as time goes on, your body is going to age. While most men in their late teens through their twenties might feel invincible, it's only a matter of time before age starts to play a role in everyday life. Injuries take longer to recover from, hangovers take longer to dissipate, aches and pains become a normal part of life, and intimate time with your partner can be compromised. If you have experienced any of the symptoms above, don't worry - it's completely normal to slow down as you get older.

The question is, what are you going to do about the aging process? For years, men were told to just "live with it," but in 2021, those days are over. The time to fight back is here, and there has never been a better opportunity to live your best life than now. Nobody understands the effects that aging can have on men but our team of professionals at Better Life do. That is why we invest all of our time developing innovative, effective men's health solutions: to give men a chance to change their future and live like they did while they were in their prime. If you're ready to take a stand against ED and live a more energetic, youthful life, know that you're not alone. At Better Life Carolinas, we are here to help by providing the most scientifically advanced treatments on the market today.

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GAINSWave® Treatment In Lake Wylie, SC

When it comes to men's health, the topic of sex can still feel taboo, especially when there are performance issues involved. At Better Life Carolinas, we have heard just about every story you can imagine regarding erectile dysfunction or ED. So if you're embarrassed and angry about your performance in the bedroom, we understand how you're feeling. In the past, men had to take strange drugs or sign off on expensive surgeries to help correct their ED, adding to their feelings of shame and hopelessness.

The good news? If you're a man dealing with ED, you don't have to settle for antiquated treatments like those referenced above. There's a new product on the block: a revolutionary, non-invasive treatment that is the first of it's kind. It's called GAINSWave®, and you can bet your bottom dollar that it isn't like anything else you have tried before.

Unlike most ED treatments, this unique approach does not require drugs or surgery. Instead, it relies on high-frequency acoustic waves to open the penis's existing blood vessels, encouraging the growth of new blood vessels while eliminating micro-plaque. To put it simply, GAINSWave® increases blood flow and gives you a chance to reclaim your libido and live life like a man in his prime.

GAINSWave® isn't a sketchy, quick-fix pill found behind the glass at a gas station. It is a comprehensive erectile dysfunction treatment with an incredible 76% success rate. With virtually no side effects, it's no wonder that men throughout the Carolinas and across the United States trust GAINSWave® to solve their ED and Peyronie's disease problems.

GainsWave Treatment Lake Wylie, SC  Emsella Chair Lake Wylie, SC

How GAINSWave® Works

It might sound like GAINSWave® is too good to be true, but the fact is this kind of erectile dysfunction treatment in Lake Wylie, SC uses scientifically-backed, time-tested technologies and applications to improve male sexual performance. Technically referred to as Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (LI-ESWT), our GAINSWave® procedure goes right to the crux of the issue. Low-intensity sound waves break up plaque formation in your penis while stimulating new blood vessel growth. These new blood vessels help get more blood to your penis, ultimately improving your ability to perform. This incredible treatment not only increases blood flow - it also causes new nerve tissues to grow, making your penis more sensitive and easily stimulated.

It all happens through a process called neurogenesis, which increases penis sensitivity. What sets GAINSWave® apart from others is the use of low-intensity sound waves to achieve increased blood flow and sensitivity. Because this procedure is completely non-invasive, you won't ever have to worry about expensive insurance claims or unsightly scarring. All you have to worry about is enjoying life like you used to, without having to undergo surgery or putting harmful substances in your body.

Here are some quick facts about Better Life Carolinas GAINSWave® treatments:

  • For most men, you can expect to have between 6 and 12 GAINSWave® sessions
  • Sessions typically take 15 to 20 minutes.
  • GAINSWave® works by releasing growth factors in your penis tissue, which generates new blood vessels.
  • GAINSWave® promotes healthy blood flow by breaking up plaque formation, giving men harder, stronger erections for longer periods of time.
  • GAINSWave® also activates dormant stem cells, which leads to new cell growth in men.

Hidden Risks of Prescription Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

If you have ever wondered why GAINSWave® treatments are so popular with men, the answer is simple. Prescription drugs meant to help ED often come with side effects that can diminish your peace of mind and day-to-day life. While some men swear by the "little blue pill," many guys aren't aware of the hidden risks associated with drugs like Viagra. The following ailments can happen both in the short term and long term:

  • Back Pain
  • Muscle Pain
  • Headaches
  • Vision Loss
  • Rashes
  • Respiratory Issues
  • Hearing Loss
  • Dizziness
  • Upset Stomach
  • Ringing in Ears
  • Fever
 VIVEVE Lake Wylie, SC

If you are having problems with erectile dysfunction, you should understand why it's happening. The primary cause of ED is associated with a lack of blood flow to the penis, making erections difficult to get and maintain. Rather than relying on a prescription pill for a quick fix, many men are using GAINSWave® treatment in Lake Wylie, SC for a natural solution with no ill side effects. ED doesn't have to be your "new normal," and neither does suffering from strange side effects from popping too many "little blue pills."

GAINSWave®, COVID-19, and ED

The global COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on the world. Over the last year, millions of Americans have had to change their lifestyles and alter daily routines to better protect themselves and their loved ones from the virus. While COVID-19 causes a litany of negative side effects, new research shows that men who contract the virus can triple their risk of developing erectile dysfunction. Because the human body is unfamiliar with this kind of virus, it responds by sending a large immune response. During this process, the body uses massive amounts of chemicals to eliminate the virus, causing horrible collateral damage in the form of cell destruction and inflammation.

 Shockwave Therapy Lake Wylie, SC

Contracting COVID-19 and suffering from ED at the same time might sound like a death sentence. However, if you are a man experiencing ED during or after contracting the COVID-19 virus, don't lose hope.

Clinical trials have shown that shockwave therapy, better known as GAINSWave®, has been shown to lower inflammation and boost vascularity by creating angiogenesis and improving endothelial function. Simply put, GAINSWave® treatments can help reverse symptoms of ED brought on by COVID-19. To learn more about how GAINSWave® can help you get back to a normal sex life after developing COVID-19, we recommend contacting our office today.

GAINSWave®: A Natural, Non-Invasive Treatment for Peyronie's Disease

Though Peyronie's Disease affects about 9% of men, it is a little-known disease that can cause physical and aesthetic issues. It is characterized by fibrous scar tissue, which forms underneath the surface of a man's penis. When this disease is left untreated or treated improperly, it can be very difficult for men to have a normal erection. This is because Peyronie's Disease can cause painful curvatures in the penis, making it nearly impossible for afflicted men to have sexual intercourse at all.

The cause of Peyronie's Disease is currently unknown. However, most cases stem from physical trauma like acute injuries after vigorous sex. Other causes include prostate surgery, autoimmune disorders, and family history. Unfortunately, traditional treatment options range from a "wait and see" approach to prescription drugs and even surgery.

Symptoms and signs of Peyronie's Disease include:

  • Erectile Dysfunction: Men with this disease may have problems achieving or maintaining erections.
  • Misshapen Penis: Some men with this disease suffer from a narrowing of the penis when erect, resembling an hourglass shape.
  • Notable Bend in Penis: One of the most common symptoms of Peyronie's Disease includes significant penis curvature, which is defined by a severe and unnatural bend.
  • Scar Tissue: A common symptom of this disease is bands of tissue or hard lumps underneath the skin of the penis.
  • Shortened Penis: Some men with this disease have reported a reduction in penis length.
  • Pain in Penis: Peyronie's has the potential to cause pain in a man's penis, regardless of whether he has an erection or not.
 Hormone Replacement Therapy Lake Wylie, SC

Fortunately, for men who are looking for a non-invasive, natural erectile dysfunction treatment in Lake Wylie, SC GAINSWave® is the answer. Using low-strength soundwaves or shockwaves, GAINSWave® treatment in Lake Wylie breaks down scar tissue affecting your penis, helps create new blood vessels, and opens up existing ones. As a result, blood flow is increased, which minimizes penis curvature and fixes the problems associated with erectile dysfunction.

P-Shot® Erectile Dysfunction Treatment in Lake Wylie, SC

Most guys will tell you that their penis is the most important part of their body. While that is not totally true from a physiological perspective, we get where they're coming from - after all, a man's penis plays a big role in his personal life and overall wellbeing. When a man has problems achieving and maintaining an erection, his quality of life can suffer dramatically, resulting in lower self-esteem and even depression. If you are a man and suffering from ED or Peyronie's Disease, you can rest easy knowing help is only a phone call away.

 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Lake Wylie, SC

In addition to GAINSWave® treatments, Better Life Carolinas also offers the Priapus Shot or P-Shot® for short. Originally used to treat wounds and sports injuries, our P-Shot® is an all-natural treatment that fortifies your body through cellular repair and rejuvenation. P-Shot® treatments have shown very promising results for men who have suffered from prostate cancer, enlarged prostates, the side effects of surgery, drug side effects from prescription pain killers, and even diabetes.

You might be asking yourself, "How does the P-Shot® work?"

This ED solution works by using platelet-rich plasma or PRP from your own body. The proteins and growth factors released by the large number of platelets activate your stem cells, which begins cellular regeneration and repair wherever the PRP are used in your body. Tissue repair in your penis is further aided by the formation of new blood vessels and collagen production.

In many cases, men who use the P-Shot® to correct erectile dysfunction or the effects of Peyronie's Disease can resume sexual activity a few hours after the treatment is applied.

Benefits of Better Life Carolinas' P-Shot® include:

  • Increased blood flow to the penis
  • Improved stamina during sexual activities
  • Improvement and possible resolution of penile curvature issues caused by Peyronie's Disease
  • Increased penis sensitivity
  • Improvements to penis girth and length

For more information about the Priapus Shot or to find out if this treatment is right for you, schedule your free consultation today.

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Latest News in Lake Wylie, SC

River trails, boat access, new dog park: See details on new York County park projects

In February, York County officials will dive deep into the possibility of a new county parks department. A glance at what’s happening already offers a pretty clear picture why.On Monday night, assistant county manager Mike Moore updated York County Council on an array of ongoing park projects. They include nature preserves, trails, boat launches and even a new dog park. All projects headed by the county, without a designated parks and recreation department similar to what cities and towns like Rock Hill, Fort Mill, Tega Cay, Clo...

In February, York County officials will dive deep into the possibility of a new county parks department. A glance at what’s happening already offers a pretty clear picture why.

On Monday night, assistant county manager Mike Moore updated York County Council on an array of ongoing park projects. They include nature preserves, trails, boat launches and even a new dog park. All projects headed by the county, without a designated parks and recreation department similar to what cities and towns like Rock Hill, Fort Mill, Tega Cay, Clover and York have.

Moore said a plan to explore a parks department will be presented at a February Council retreat. For now, work continues throughout the growing list of county recreation sites.

“These are exciting things and we’re very blessed to have this touch all areas of the county,” said Council Chairwoman Christi Cox.

The biggest park project is Catawba Bend Preserve, a planned 1,900-acre nature preserve on the Rock Hill side of the Catawba River. A master plan was approved and adopted. An initial engineering contract should be ready for first phase work in January.

“That includes the park arrival, the gate house entry, river gate, greenway and hiking trail system,” Moore said.

The project still needs utilities and telecommunications plans. The county will pursue grants, branding and marketing for park features. Some former residences on the site will be removed, with demolition expected next year. There also will be controlled burns and thinning of some forested areas.

“That will provide for fire breaks and it will mitigate the potential for wildfires,” Moore said. “A lot of that work had not been done for some period of time, so we want to be careful in maintaining that in the event we get dry conditions or drought.”

Catawba Bend isn’t the only one. A park at Worth Mountain has its master plan contract in place. A site visit is set for Dec. 17 for the county group that will review the master plan for upgrades. Nanny’s Mountain has a contract for trailhead construction plans. A master plan should be ready for Council review in January. A public meeting on plans there should come in January.

Veterans Memorial Park in York has a new sign installed and landscaping. On-street parking improvements are planned too.

After a newly reopened Ebenezer Park drew huge crowds this summer, some neighbors told county officials there were new traffic problems. The county hired a traffic consultant to survey the park on Labor Day weekend. That study could generate park improvements, in a review that also will consider restrooms, campsite upgrades and drainage. A design contract for improvements could be ready for approval by the end of the month.

This summer the county approved a lease and utility agreement for Allison Creek Park. Construction began in September. Improvements should be complete by the end of 2022.

“The (boat) ramp is going to be closed through the end of construction, so we’ll work to mitigate that,” Moore said.

The new parks tax district set up in Lake Wylie by referendum already has multiple land purchases to its name. The 87-acre Woodend Farm property at 5649 S.C. Hwy. 557 will allow events, festivals and hiking. A master plan will be developed soon.

“Staff is now looking at plans for facilities and maintenance repairs and improvements, how we’re going to go about that,” Moore said.

The almost seven-acre goat farm property at 3972 Hands Mill Highway now belongs to the county too. An agreement allows the seller to remain on the property through February. A master plan will follow for the site likely to become a farmers market.

On Monday, Council approved a contract to buy five acres in Lake Wylie for a future dog park.

“Hopefully with the approval of that we’ll be able to go forward with planning for that park and master plan, and get a design on that,” Moore said.

For many years, prior Councils bristled at the notion of a county parks department. When projects came up in Lake Wylie and Fort Mill for county hospitality tax funding (for what now are Field Day Park, Comporium Athletic Park and others), then-elected officials stated the county wasn’t in the business of a parks department.

Instead, the county traditionally provided money to various municipal recreation departments. Two years ago, mayors from Rock Hill, Fort Mill, Tega Cay and York jointly addressed council to ask for more funding since a large portion of their recreation league participants come from the county. The mayors argued funding hadn’t changed significantly in years, but population had.

When past councils pushed back against a parks department, the main county-run recreation draw was Ebenezer Park. There was concern about upkeep and staffing needed to add more sites. In recent years, the county and area municipalities have shown a willingness to spend on recreation. Field Day Park has a staff member like Ebenezer. The Catawba Bend project was a $21 million purchase.

New and improved county sites will join recent and coming municipal additions like Catawba Park in Tega Cay, Miracle Park in Rock Hill, Banks Athletic Park in Fort Mill and others.

An advisory on Lake Wylie warns to keep clear of detected toxins. Here’s where.

Boaters, swimmers and other recreational users on Lake Wylie should steer clear of potentially harmful algae blooms, says the state health department.The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control issued a recreational water advisory Thursday for a portion of the lake after detecting the bloom. A DHEC monitoring site shows the advisory for a cove off Acacia Road, on the main ...

Boaters, swimmers and other recreational users on Lake Wylie should steer clear of potentially harmful algae blooms, says the state health department.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control issued a recreational water advisory Thursday for a portion of the lake after detecting the bloom. A DHEC monitoring site shows the advisory for a cove off Acacia Road, on the main channel from the Concord Road peninsula in Lake Wylie.

Pets and livestock can be harmed by microtoxins from an algae bloom. People can become sick. Fish caught in those areas should be rinsed thoroughly before consumption.

An advisory is issued when an algae bloom is identified and is producing toxins greater than state recreational standards, according to DHEC. Nine more monitoring stations on the lake have watches. A watch means a bloom has been identified but isn’t yet producing toxins at or beyond the state threshold for an advisory.

Most of the watch level samples are in and around Tega Cay, prompting flash messages to the public from the city. The advisory level cove is across the lake from the city. There also is a watch on a Rock Hill cove near Lake Wylie Dam.

DHEC routinely monitors stations across the South Carolina sides of Lake Wylie. A Sept. 28 test resulted in high levels of microcystins, toxins produced by cyanobacteria. It’s formerly known as blue-green algae. Tests found levels at least 25% higher than the state safety threshold.

The algae has been seen throughout several coves, but the area of the advisory reaches along the shoreline of the lake. The watches do not include open water sections of the lake.

“Until further notice, no one should swim, wade or come into contact with any discolored water or scum, foam or algae in Lake Wylie ,” DHEC aquatic science program manager Bryan Rabon said in a release Thursday.

DHEC is in contact with North Carolina environmental agencies, along with Duke Energy that manages the Catawba River and its lakes.

Anyone who experiences illness after coming in contact with the water should seek medical attention. Veterinarians should be contacted for any pets or livestock that may come in contact with the blooms.

In August, and again in September, the Charlotte Observer reported blue-green algae blooms spotted on the North Carolina side of Lake Wylie. Blooms were spotted near Boyds Cove, not far from the state line that bisects the lake.

YMCA’s Camp Thunderbird expects record number of campers, even with some COVID-19 protocols still in place

YMCA’s Camp Thunderbird expects record number of campers, even with some COVID-19 protocols still in place.LAKE WYLIE, S.C. (WBTV) - As school winds down, plans for summer ramp up, and if you’re planning on sending your child to summer camp, you’re not alone.YMCA’s Camp Thunderbird along Lake Wylie is expecting a record number of campers.The fact that registration is through the roof is a grea...

YMCA’s Camp Thunderbird expects record number of campers, even with some COVID-19 protocols still in place.

LAKE WYLIE, S.C. (WBTV) - As school winds down, plans for summer ramp up, and if you’re planning on sending your child to summer camp, you’re not alone.

YMCA’s Camp Thunderbird along Lake Wylie is expecting a record number of campers.

The fact that registration is through the roof is a great sign of things getting back to the way they were before the pandemic.

While there will be some COVID protocols still in place, there will also be more opportunities for campers to move and interact more freely.

Jessica Hreha’s 7-year-old son, Logan, was at Camp Thunderbird’s overnight camp for a week last year.

This year, he’ll be there for two weeks.

“He has tons of stories when he comes home from camp, and it really was a no brainer that we would send him back this year,” Hreha said. “He’s completely over the moon.”

Many other families apparently share the same sentiment.

Kimberly Conroy, the executive director of Camp Thunderbird, said that right now, overnight and day camps are at 96-percent capacity.

“We’ve already broken the day camp record, and the resident camp record we anticipate we’ll easily break,” Conroy said.

The chance to have a face-to-face interaction after the pandemic kept kids apart is a big selling point for many campers.

“At camp, we don’t allow technology, so the kids don’t have tablets, computers, cell phones, not even Apple watches exist at camp, so it really allows the kids to focus on relationships, activity,” Conroy said.

There will still be some COVID protocols in place.

For example, during check-in and check-out, parents will park outside the cabin and won’t go in to limit potential exposure.

Also, COVID testing will be available on site.

New this year is the opportunity for campers to interact with others outside their cabin, instead of campers having to stick with their cabinmates.

“Having this special week here or two weeks here is just something that these kids are gonna – it’s going to be the highlight of their summer,” Hreha said.

The Y said that Camp Thunderbird overnight prices are slightly higher this year – $75 per week more – due to inflation and higher costs for things like food.

You can register for YMCA Camp Thunderbird’s overnight camps here.

If you’re interested in YMCA Camp Thunderbird’s day camps, you can register here.

With the great volume of kids, the need for camp staff is more critical now than ever, and the Y is still hiring.

Click this link, and choose Camp Thunderbird in the branch drop-down menu for a look at jobs.

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Readers told us their favorite sports bar in York County. Where to catch the big game

If there’s a sport happening in front of a network or cable video camera, it’s probably beaming straight to Lake Wylie.On the homebound side of S.C. 49, up a couple of hills from the lake, sits a restaurant and bar started by avid bikers. Yet it’s always been a place for families, like the community itself where Clover School District enrollment grows year after year as people move into newer and newer subdivisions.“We’ve just been so fortunate to have such an excellent community behind us,” ...

If there’s a sport happening in front of a network or cable video camera, it’s probably beaming straight to Lake Wylie.

On the homebound side of S.C. 49, up a couple of hills from the lake, sits a restaurant and bar started by avid bikers. Yet it’s always been a place for families, like the community itself where Clover School District enrollment grows year after year as people move into newer and newer subdivisions.

“We’ve just been so fortunate to have such an excellent community behind us,” said Chris Lorusso, managing partner at Sweetwater Sports Bar & Grill. “The area’s grown insanely over the last few years, so it certainly has helped.”

Sweetwater has more than 30 televisions. It has every available sports package its owners could satellite or stream. On a typical day a lunch or dinner customer might see a golf tournament, basketball game, sports highlight show and football clip without having to turn to the left or right to order.

“We really try to be as diverse as we can in showing sports, anything that people might want to watch,” Lorusso said.

Then there are the atypical days. Maybe the U.S. men or women have a World Cup soccer game. Maybe it’s the NBA Finals, or the World Series. Pretty much any time the Carolina Panthers play will do for the gathering spot just south of Charlotte.

“We certainly jam for football season,” Lorusso said.

This weekend brings a gift for Sweetwater.

The NCAA men’s and women’s basketball tournaments were scheduled long ago, but recent games brought some pretty enticing matchups. Rivals Duke and North Carolina, both with avid area fan bases, will meet Saturday -- for the first time in an NCAA tournament game. And Larusso thought last Saturday was busy.

“That is definitely going to be an eventful day for sure,” Lorusso said.

On the women’s side, South Carolina plays in its final four round on Friday. Championship games follow for the women on Sunday, men on Monday.

By at least one account, Sweetwater may be about the best place around to catch those games.

The Herald asked readers a pretty simple question. Where is the best place to grab a bite or beverage, and watch sports? Sports bars worked. Restaurants with televisions worked. A bowling alley and billiard hall made the list. The Herald took reader feedback and created a 16-team bracket, then gave readers all month to go online and pick their favorites.

A highly unscientific seeding system that accounted for reader input, number of locations throughout three counties and other details put Sweetwater at a No. 9 seed. The first round matchup was No. 8 Lake Wylie Bowl N’ Bounce.

Sweetwater topped its cross-community opponent with 84% of the vote. The next round Sweetwater drew No. 1 Towne Tavern. In easily the closest contest of the quarterfinal round, Sweetwater bested the restaurant group with Fort Mill, Rock Hill, York and Indian Land locations by a 52% to 48% count. The back-and-forth matchup was the second straight seed upset for Sweetwater, with two more to come.

The semifinal round saw Sweetwater against tournament darling and No. 13 R&B Pub House in York. Sweetwater earned 55% of the vote to advance to the final.

The final saw more online votes cast than in the prior rounds combined. There were 28,572 votes cast when Sweetwater faced No. 6 Burgers & Barley of Rock Hill. Multiple times in the final day, both restaurants had half the vote. When it ended, Sweetwater edged ahead with 52%. Sweetwater collected almost 15,000 votes just in the final round.

Lorusso’s father, Steve, decided to bring a restaurant concept to the building he and Mad Dog Custom Cycles owned more than a decade ago. What began as Wylie Gators became Sweetwater. The restaurant grew in popularity and parking, at one point buying the former Checkers drive-thru restaurant site beside Sweetwater just for the extra spaces.

Chris Lorusso has been involved since 2011. Now there are about 70 employees, many having worked there for years. There’s an outdoor patio with televisions that was just screened. The place is as known now for its chopped Southwest salads as its drinks or bar food.

Burgers are hand-pattied and made to order. Plenty of menu items and sauces are scratch made.

“We just do comfort food really well,” Lorusso said. “We don’t have anything too extravagant on the menu, nothing that you haven’t heard of before. We just do it with care, with consistency.”

The recent run through the Hardwood bracket shows a strong fan base, but Sweetwater Sports Bar & Grill isn’t alone. Most restaurants or bars still up and going after the COVID pandemic have had their backers. Lorusso said it was a confusing time going from business as usual to take-out or outside only, or 10 feet apart, then slowly returning to normal.

“The last couple of years have definitely been the most challenging times in this business,” Lorusso said. “But again, if it wasn’t for the support of this community, I’m not sure if we would have made it through.”

Sweetwater tries to do its part. When the Panthers made a Super Bowl run a few years back, the restaurant had a kickoff event with giveaways. Sweetwater has plenty of local high school or college students employed, to further promote the family vibe.

For his part, Lorusso takes what in some situations might seem a fair weather fan approach. To him, it’s just good business. Duke or Carolina? Home team or road? Underdog or heavy favorite? For Lorusso, it’s all about the hospitality.

“I’m cheering for whoever the guest is cheering for at that moment,” he said.

NCAA basketball tournaments still have plenty of action left with local interest. There are final four teams remaining in the Division I men’s and women’s tournaments. The women hold semifinals Friday and the championship Sunday. The men play semifinals Saturday and their championship Monday.

Here, according to ncaa.com, are the matchups that will decide the brackets:

▪ Women’s semifinal, South Carolina vs. Louisville, 7 p.m. Friday

▪ Women’s semifinal, Stanford vs. Connecticut, 9:30 p.m. Friday

▪ Men’s semifinal, Villanova vs. Kansas, 6:09 p.m. Saturday

▪ Men’s semifinal, North Carolina vs. Duke, 8:49 p.m. Saturday

▪ Women’s final, 8 p.m. Sunday

▪ Men’s final, 9:20 p.m. Monday

This story was originally published March 31, 2022 5:02 PM.

Here’s the latest on more than 1,000 new homes planned in York and Lancaster counties

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.Projects include:▪ Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivisi...

More than 1,000 new homes and townhomes are proposed in York and Lancaster counties.

Some already have their decisions, while many more await decisions from planning commissions or councils. The York County planning commission will meet May 9. Decisions must be made on a final land sale in Baxter, a large York property with hundreds of proposed homes, and an extension of time for a large Lake Wylie development.

Projects include:

▪ Owner Clear Springs Baxter and developer Fielding Homes applied for a new townhome subdivision at Sixth Baxter Crossing and Hugh Street, near North Sutton Road. The property is almost 3 acres. The plan involves 20 townhomes.

The Borough at Sixth Baxter is, according to county information sent to the planning commission, the last lot in Baxter Village to be sold by Clear Springs Baxter. The property is near both residential and commercial space, including an urgent care site.

▪ The Bull Creek project in York is back up for county review. County planning staff recommends against the plan for a 409-lot manufactured home community at 975 McAfee Court. County planning staff doesn’t believe that scale of development is consistent with residential and agricultural uses in that area now, according to informtion sent to the planning commission. The 155-acre property has 62 mobile homes on it now.

▪ Owners of 14 acres on Saluda Street in Rock Hill applied to rezone the property to allow a new 11-home subdivision. There are five manufactured homes there, plus wooded and grassy areas. A sketch plan shows all 11 lots off a single entrance from Saluda, which leads to a cul-de-sac.

The property is east of Ogden Farms and south of Cedarbrook, between Porter Black Road and Autumnwood Drive.

▪ Almost 200 more homes are still planned, but could come later than was laid out in a prior county approval. Fielding Homes got county approval to build four new phases of Paddlers Cove in Lake Wylie. The 135-acre new portion of the existing subdivision is set for 195 homes.

County approvals typically come with two-year vested rights. Developers have to request annual extensions if they don’t start until after the vested rights period ends. Developers get up to five such extensions. The owner asks the county now for an extension to run through March 2023.

The Lancaster County planning commission met Thursday night. The commission recommended a zoning change for almost 44 acres that would allow a new home subdivision. Lancaster County Council will make the final decision.

The property on the southeast corner of Fork Hill Road and Little Dude Avenue is owned by R&C Investments. Earl Coulston applied for the zoning change. The site is just north of Kershaw, about a mile west of Haile Gold Mine.

Dale Robertson is a partner with R&C Investments. Robertson has done other residential projects in that area, with the mine in mind.

“There’s just a lot of people that are driving an hour and fifteen minutes, some of them two hours, to work,” Robertson told the planning commission Thursday. “There’s hardly no houses down there for people to buy.”

A plan with an exact number of new homes hasn’t been submitted, but the new zoning would allow up to 2.5 homes per acre. Or, roughly 110 homes for a property that size.

An even larger project was on the planning commission agenda Thursday, but was deferred until next month. Rezoning and a development agreement are proposed for Arbor Walk. That new home subdivision could have 233 homes on almost 113 acres on Vance Baker Road.

The planning commission in Rock Hill met Tuesday, where one of several property proposals was the Arbors at Seven Oaks project. Owner Rock Hill Multifamily Investments applied for preliminary plat approval on Springsteen Road and Evelyn Street. There are three parcels, two in front of the Seven Oaks subdivivision and the other with a pond on Evelyn.

Plans show 148 townhomes proposed on 21 acres. The site was approved for 220 apartments in 2014. Plans have changed and been pushed back several times due to utility and other negotiations.

Several road upgrades are part of the plan. Access to the site southwest of Seven Oaks Boulevard will come from a new driveway connection to Springsteen. The area northeast of Seven Oaks Boulevard will have a new drive onto Springsteen and and another onto Evelyn, across from Wildwood Drive. A left turn lane on Springsteen at Evelyn will be added, and the intersection will be realigned. Springsteen also will be widened to create a center turn lane.

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