GAINSWave® Treatment in Marvin, NC

Ask Us Anything!

GAINSWave® Treatment843-737-2597

Quick Quote

Few things are guaranteed in life, but there is one thing that you can count on for sure: as time goes on, your body is going to age. While most men in their late teens through their twenties might feel invincible, it's only a matter of time before age starts to play a role in everyday life. Injuries take longer to recover from, hangovers take longer to dissipate, aches and pains become a normal part of life, and intimate time with your partner can be compromised. If you have experienced any of the symptoms above, don't worry - it's completely normal to slow down as you get older.

The question is, what are you going to do about the aging process? For years, men were told to just "live with it," but in 2021, those days are over. The time to fight back is here, and there has never been a better opportunity to live your best life than now. Nobody understands the effects that aging can have on men but our team of professionals at Better Life do. That is why we invest all of our time developing innovative, effective men's health solutions: to give men a chance to change their future and live like they did while they were in their prime. If you're ready to take a stand against ED and live a more energetic, youthful life, know that you're not alone. At Better Life Carolinas, we are here to help by providing the most scientifically advanced treatments on the market today.

Service Areas

GAINSWave® Treatment In Marvin, NC

When it comes to men's health, the topic of sex can still feel taboo, especially when there are performance issues involved. At Better Life Carolinas, we have heard just about every story you can imagine regarding erectile dysfunction or ED. So if you're embarrassed and angry about your performance in the bedroom, we understand how you're feeling. In the past, men had to take strange drugs or sign off on expensive surgeries to help correct their ED, adding to their feelings of shame and hopelessness.

The good news? If you're a man dealing with ED, you don't have to settle for antiquated treatments like those referenced above. There's a new product on the block: a revolutionary, non-invasive treatment that is the first of it's kind. It's called GAINSWave®, and you can bet your bottom dollar that it isn't like anything else you have tried before.

Unlike most ED treatments, this unique approach does not require drugs or surgery. Instead, it relies on high-frequency acoustic waves to open the penis's existing blood vessels, encouraging the growth of new blood vessels while eliminating micro-plaque. To put it simply, GAINSWave® increases blood flow and gives you a chance to reclaim your libido and live life like a man in his prime.

GAINSWave® isn't a sketchy, quick-fix pill found behind the glass at a gas station. It is a comprehensive erectile dysfunction treatment with an incredible 76% success rate. With virtually no side effects, it's no wonder that men throughout the Carolinas and across the United States trust GAINSWave® to solve their ED and Peyronie's disease problems.

GainsWave Treatment Marvin, NC  Emsella Chair Marvin, NC

How GAINSWave® Works

It might sound like GAINSWave® is too good to be true, but the fact is this kind of erectile dysfunction treatment in Marvin, NC uses scientifically-backed, time-tested technologies and applications to improve male sexual performance. Technically referred to as Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (LI-ESWT), our GAINSWave® procedure goes right to the crux of the issue. Low-intensity sound waves break up plaque formation in your penis while stimulating new blood vessel growth. These new blood vessels help get more blood to your penis, ultimately improving your ability to perform. This incredible treatment not only increases blood flow - it also causes new nerve tissues to grow, making your penis more sensitive and easily stimulated.

It all happens through a process called neurogenesis, which increases penis sensitivity. What sets GAINSWave® apart from others is the use of low-intensity sound waves to achieve increased blood flow and sensitivity. Because this procedure is completely non-invasive, you won't ever have to worry about expensive insurance claims or unsightly scarring. All you have to worry about is enjoying life like you used to, without having to undergo surgery or putting harmful substances in your body.

Here are some quick facts about Better Life Carolinas GAINSWave® treatments:

  • For most men, you can expect to have between 6 and 12 GAINSWave® sessions
  • Sessions typically take 15 to 20 minutes.
  • GAINSWave® works by releasing growth factors in your penis tissue, which generates new blood vessels.
  • GAINSWave® promotes healthy blood flow by breaking up plaque formation, giving men harder, stronger erections for longer periods of time.
  • GAINSWave® also activates dormant stem cells, which leads to new cell growth in men.

Hidden Risks of Prescription Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

If you have ever wondered why GAINSWave® treatments are so popular with men, the answer is simple. Prescription drugs meant to help ED often come with side effects that can diminish your peace of mind and day-to-day life. While some men swear by the "little blue pill," many guys aren't aware of the hidden risks associated with drugs like Viagra. The following ailments can happen both in the short term and long term:

  • Back Pain
  • Muscle Pain
  • Headaches
  • Vision Loss
  • Rashes
  • Respiratory Issues
  • Hearing Loss
  • Dizziness
  • Upset Stomach
  • Ringing in Ears
  • Fever
 VIVEVE Marvin, NC

If you are having problems with erectile dysfunction, you should understand why it's happening. The primary cause of ED is associated with a lack of blood flow to the penis, making erections difficult to get and maintain. Rather than relying on a prescription pill for a quick fix, many men are using GAINSWave® treatment in Marvin, NC for a natural solution with no ill side effects. ED doesn't have to be your "new normal," and neither does suffering from strange side effects from popping too many "little blue pills."

GAINSWave®, COVID-19, and ED

The global COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on the world. Over the last year, millions of Americans have had to change their lifestyles and alter daily routines to better protect themselves and their loved ones from the virus. While COVID-19 causes a litany of negative side effects, new research shows that men who contract the virus can triple their risk of developing erectile dysfunction. Because the human body is unfamiliar with this kind of virus, it responds by sending a large immune response. During this process, the body uses massive amounts of chemicals to eliminate the virus, causing horrible collateral damage in the form of cell destruction and inflammation.

 Shockwave Therapy Marvin, NC

Contracting COVID-19 and suffering from ED at the same time might sound like a death sentence. However, if you are a man experiencing ED during or after contracting the COVID-19 virus, don't lose hope.

Clinical trials have shown that shockwave therapy, better known as GAINSWave®, has been shown to lower inflammation and boost vascularity by creating angiogenesis and improving endothelial function. Simply put, GAINSWave® treatments can help reverse symptoms of ED brought on by COVID-19. To learn more about how GAINSWave® can help you get back to a normal sex life after developing COVID-19, we recommend contacting our office today.

GAINSWave®: A Natural, Non-Invasive Treatment for Peyronie's Disease

Though Peyronie's Disease affects about 9% of men, it is a little-known disease that can cause physical and aesthetic issues. It is characterized by fibrous scar tissue, which forms underneath the surface of a man's penis. When this disease is left untreated or treated improperly, it can be very difficult for men to have a normal erection. This is because Peyronie's Disease can cause painful curvatures in the penis, making it nearly impossible for afflicted men to have sexual intercourse at all.

The cause of Peyronie's Disease is currently unknown. However, most cases stem from physical trauma like acute injuries after vigorous sex. Other causes include prostate surgery, autoimmune disorders, and family history. Unfortunately, traditional treatment options range from a "wait and see" approach to prescription drugs and even surgery.

Symptoms and signs of Peyronie's Disease include:

  • Erectile Dysfunction: Men with this disease may have problems achieving or maintaining erections.
  • Misshapen Penis: Some men with this disease suffer from a narrowing of the penis when erect, resembling an hourglass shape.
  • Notable Bend in Penis: One of the most common symptoms of Peyronie's Disease includes significant penis curvature, which is defined by a severe and unnatural bend.
  • Scar Tissue: A common symptom of this disease is bands of tissue or hard lumps underneath the skin of the penis.
  • Shortened Penis: Some men with this disease have reported a reduction in penis length.
  • Pain in Penis: Peyronie's has the potential to cause pain in a man's penis, regardless of whether he has an erection or not.
 Hormone Replacement Therapy Marvin, NC

Fortunately, for men who are looking for a non-invasive, natural erectile dysfunction treatment in Marvin, NC GAINSWave® is the answer. Using low-strength soundwaves or shockwaves, GAINSWave® treatment in Marvin breaks down scar tissue affecting your penis, helps create new blood vessels, and opens up existing ones. As a result, blood flow is increased, which minimizes penis curvature and fixes the problems associated with erectile dysfunction.

P-Shot® Erectile Dysfunction Treatment in Marvin, NC

Most guys will tell you that their penis is the most important part of their body. While that is not totally true from a physiological perspective, we get where they're coming from - after all, a man's penis plays a big role in his personal life and overall wellbeing. When a man has problems achieving and maintaining an erection, his quality of life can suffer dramatically, resulting in lower self-esteem and even depression. If you are a man and suffering from ED or Peyronie's Disease, you can rest easy knowing help is only a phone call away.

 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Marvin, NC

In addition to GAINSWave® treatments, Better Life Carolinas also offers the Priapus Shot or P-Shot® for short. Originally used to treat wounds and sports injuries, our P-Shot® is an all-natural treatment that fortifies your body through cellular repair and rejuvenation. P-Shot® treatments have shown very promising results for men who have suffered from prostate cancer, enlarged prostates, the side effects of surgery, drug side effects from prescription pain killers, and even diabetes.

You might be asking yourself, "How does the P-Shot® work?"

This ED solution works by using platelet-rich plasma or PRP from your own body. The proteins and growth factors released by the large number of platelets activate your stem cells, which begins cellular regeneration and repair wherever the PRP are used in your body. Tissue repair in your penis is further aided by the formation of new blood vessels and collagen production.

In many cases, men who use the P-Shot® to correct erectile dysfunction or the effects of Peyronie's Disease can resume sexual activity a few hours after the treatment is applied.

Benefits of Better Life Carolinas' P-Shot® include:

  • Increased blood flow to the penis
  • Improved stamina during sexual activities
  • Improvement and possible resolution of penile curvature issues caused by Peyronie's Disease
  • Increased penis sensitivity
  • Improvements to penis girth and length

For more information about the Priapus Shot or to find out if this treatment is right for you, schedule your free consultation today.

Contact Us

Latest News in Marvin, NC

Habitat for Humanity International and Lowe's continue partnership, announce new strategic focus to support home repair and rehab projects across the U.S.

PR NewswireATLANTA, June 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- For nearly two decades, Habitat for Humanity International and Lowe's have worked together to build and improve safe, decent, and healthy homes around the world. Today, Lowe's and Habitat announced a renewed focus of their partnership to support home repair and rehab projects undertaken by local Habitat for Humanity organizations across the U.S.Lowe's is allocating $2.5 million this year to fund three new grants that will be used for home repair and preservation efforts in owner-...

PR Newswire

ATLANTA, June 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- For nearly two decades, Habitat for Humanity International and Lowe's have worked together to build and improve safe, decent, and healthy homes around the world. Today, Lowe's and Habitat announced a renewed focus of their partnership to support home repair and rehab projects undertaken by local Habitat for Humanity organizations across the U.S.

Lowe's is allocating $2.5 million this year to fund three new grants that will be used for home repair and preservation efforts in owner-occupied homes. This year, 100 local Habitat for Humanity organizations will complete 628 projects with the support of these grants, including 67 critical home repair projects, 276 home preservation projects, and 285 Housing Plus projects to provide aging in place solutions that help make homes safe and accessible.

"Supporting communities is in our DNA, and we thank Habitat for Humanity International for helping us create a positive impact across the country," said Marvin Ellison, Lowe's chairman and CEO. "We are committed to making homes better for all, and through this partnership we can make a difference to improve access to safe and affordable housing in our communities."

Studies show that across the U.S., access to quality, affordable home repair and modification services continues to be out of reach for low to moderate income households. With the support of these grants, local Habitat organizations will be able to further their efforts of helping homeowners and their families address critical health and safety issues in their homes.

"Lowe's has been an integral part of our efforts to help families build strength, stability and independence through shelter, as well as build more resilient communities," said Adrienne Goolsby, senior vice president of U.S. and Canada at Habitat for Humanity International. "We are excited to see the incredible impact Habitat affiliates will make with this funding and how they will help families and communities grow, thrive and prosper. We are so grateful for Lowe's continued support and partnership this year."

In the nearly 20 years since Lowe's and Habitat began their partnership in 2003, Lowe's has supported many of the global housing nonprofit's efforts, including the Women Build Program and Habitat's Neighborhood Revitalization program. Lowe's has also proudly supported Habitat's Cost of Home national advocacy campaign and sponsored local Habitat builds and employee volunteer days, in addition to providing affiliate grants and donated products. Lowe's commitment through 2022 will bring the company's total contributions to Habitat to more than $84 million.

About Habitat for Humanity

Driven by the vision that everyone needs a decent place to live, Habitat for Humanity began in 1976 as a grassroots effort on a community farm in southern Georgia. The Christian housing organization has since grown to become a leading global nonprofit working in local communities across all 50 states in the U.S. and in more than 70 countries. Families and individuals in need of a hand up partner with Habitat for Humanity to build or improve a place they can call home. Habitat homeowners help build their own homes alongside volunteers and pay an affordable mortgage. Through financial support, volunteering or adding a voice to support affordable housing, everyone can help families achieve the strength, stability and self-reliance they need to build better lives for themselves. Through shelter, we empower. To learn more, visit habitat.org.

About Lowe's

Lowe's Companies, Inc. (NYSE: LOW) is a FORTUNE® 50 home improvement company serving approximately 19 million customer transactions a week in the United States and Canada. With fiscal year 2021 sales of over $96 billion, Lowe's and its related businesses operate or service nearly 2,200 home improvement and hardware stores and employ over 300,000 associates. Based in Mooresville, N.C., Lowe's supports the communities it serves through programs focused on creating safe, affordable housing and helping to develop the next generation of skilled trade experts. For more information, visit Lowes.com.

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/habitat-for-humanity-international-and-lowes-continue-partnership-announce-new-strategic-focus-to-support-home-repair-and-rehab-projects-across-the-us-301559605.html

SOURCE Habitat for Humanity International

How a Herd of Cattle Helped an Iraq War Veteran with PTSD Find Healing: 'Animals Gave Me a Second Chance'

Marvin Frink is walking through a field of bright green sorghum grass beneath a scorching North Carolina sun. He turns toward a nearby pasture where his herd of Angus cattle are grazing and lets out a loud whoop in their direction: "Whoo-hoo! Let's go!" he calls.At the sound of his voice, the cattle erupt in a chorus of moos. Slowly, one animal, then another, and finally the entire herd ambles across the field toward Frink, surrounding him. He points toward a few at the front and rattles off their names: Grace, Mercy, Daisy ...

Marvin Frink is walking through a field of bright green sorghum grass beneath a scorching North Carolina sun. He turns toward a nearby pasture where his herd of Angus cattle are grazing and lets out a loud whoop in their direction: "Whoo-hoo! Let's go!" he calls.

At the sound of his voice, the cattle erupt in a chorus of moos. Slowly, one animal, then another, and finally the entire herd ambles across the field toward Frink, surrounding him. He points toward a few at the front and rattles off their names: Grace, Mercy, Daisy — the last one named in honor of his grandmother.

"Once I had someone come here who said to me, 'Man that's a lot of beef,'" Frink, 53, tells PEOPLE. "But I don't see them like that. These are my counselors. Cows don't judge us for what we've been through."

It's been nearly two decades since the cattle rancher was a soldier, but what Frink went through during his three deployments in Iraq and 16 years as a civilian anti-terrorism specialist still haunts him through nightmares, migraines and bouts of hypervigilance. Like far too many veterans suffering from PTSD, that pain nearly drove him to suicide.

A recent Wounded Warrior Project survey found that one in four vets say they've experienced suicidal thoughts in the past year.

But Frink discovered what he calls "agritherapy"—working on the land and with animals as a way of healing the psychological wounds left over from combat. In 2018, Frink bought 42 acres of farmland in Red Springs, N.C, and began raising cows and chickens.

"Farming gave me a sense of purpose again," he says. "And animals gave me a second chance."

For more on Frink's story, pick up the latest issue of PEOPLE, on newsstands Friday, or subscribe here.

Since then, he has shared his story and opened his Briarwood Cattle Farm, located less than an hour south of the sprawling U.S. Army facility at Ft. Bragg, N.C., to hundreds of other veterans struggling with PTSD. He hopes to show them that a second chance is possible for them too.

Frank and his wife, Tanisha, 45, welcome busloads of veterans from the Wounded Warrior Project on visits to the farm (their motto: "We're more than a brand, we're a family") to talk about agriculture—and mental health. This past May, they hosted a dozen vets with PTSD for a "Day of Healing."

"If I'm feeling this way, I know my battle buddies are feeling the same," says the cattle farmer of his desire to help.

Frink grew up in Melbourne, Florida, the son of a Baptist preacher father and a mother who worked for a NASA contractor. He left college early to join the Army in 1990 and when Operation Desert Storm began a few months later, he was sent to Iraq. He would return for two more tours of battle duty, going back for a final time in 2003.

Combat injuries to his knee and back forced him into medical retirement in 2004, while his psychological scars from the atrocities of war were less visible. "It sticks with you," he says. Talking about it, however, was difficult. "I didn't know how to ask for help," Frink says. "I didn't want to be seen as the weak link."

After leaving the service, Frink stayed on with special forces in Ft. Bragg as a civilian anti-terrorism specialist, a job in which he would "see things, know things, hear things."

"It was like I was still deployed," he says.

He thought often about suicide. "I wanted to go back to deployment. I felt if something did happen, it would look as if it was just all part of war."

In 2011, Marvin confided in his mom, Minnie, but "was too embarrassed to call my dad," he says. 'He was my Superman." Then, his father, Rev. Kirby, called him and told him to come to Florida for the weekend. When he arrived, his dad took him to a cattle ranch owned by a family friend who was also a Vietnam vet.

Late in the afternoon, the farmer told Frink to fill up the troughs in a field with feed. So Frink spread pellets around the base of an oak tree. Then he sat on the grass to watch as the cows lay down and chewed their cud. "They looked like they were talking to me," he recalls. "And that's when the therapy began—I started talking to them, and the next thing you know, I was feeling better."

When Frink returned to his parents that evening and described his day, his father looked at him and declared: "Now, that's my son. I haven't seen you smile in a long time."

Today, Frink sees a therapist and takes medication for his anxiety. He still has daily challenges, but most mornings he rises with a sense of hope. "I peep out the window when the sun's getting ready to rise because I can't wait to get outside," he says.

"I talk to my cattle and tell them how I'm doing—and that helps me come back in the house and talk to my family."

For confidential support, vets and loved ones can contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 800-273-8255 or text 838255

If you or someone you know is considering suicide, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), text "STRENGTH" to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

Union County Public Schools to hold job fair to try to fill dozens of positions

UNION COUNTY, N.C. — Union County Public Schools will hold a job fair Wednesday to fill dozens of much-needed positions across the district.The fair will run from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday at the UCPS Transportation Center on Goldmine Road in Monroe.The 53 public schools, which educate roughly 41,500 students, need candidates to fill roles in food service, transportation, custodial service, facilities, after-school programs and to serve as substitute teachers.UCPS looking to fill dozens of open jobs across a variety...

UNION COUNTY, N.C. — Union County Public Schools will hold a job fair Wednesday to fill dozens of much-needed positions across the district.

The fair will run from 9 a.m. to noon Wednesday at the UCPS Transportation Center on Goldmine Road in Monroe.

The 53 public schools, which educate roughly 41,500 students, need candidates to fill roles in food service, transportation, custodial service, facilities, after-school programs and to serve as substitute teachers.

UCPS looking to fill dozens of open jobs across a variety of services with job fair on Wednesday

Custodial service manager says he needs to fill 58 vacancies

Union County Public Schools and other counties have implemented raises, bonuses and other incentives during the pandemic in an effort to keep staff

The district’s online application portal lists hundreds of open job positions. Those listings do include teaching roles, which is not the focus of Wednesday’s job fair.

The district’s custodial manager, Juan Fernandez, said he needs to fill 58 full-time positions across his custodial teams in district schools.

Compared to pre-COVID-19 years, Fernandez said the need for applicants has quintupled. Fernandez, who started as a custodian in 2008, took over as manager in 2018. In 2018 and 2019, he said it was more typical to have five to 10 positions open each summer, not the current 58.

“The pandemic has changed everything, 'cause a lot of people … we lost a lot of people to retirement. A lot of people were, I guess they panicked. They left for other jobs. It has changed a lot. When the pandemic started, we started getting … the vacancy rate jumped up,” Fernandez said.

Despite the challenges of hiring in the pandemic, Fernandez said the job is a good opportunity for advancement, benefits and friendly schedule.

“I have enjoyed it. It’s a good schedule, it’s Monday through Fridays. You have the weekends for the family. At the time I started I had little kids,” Fernandez said. “It’s flexible because you have time for your family too.”“I have enjoyed it. It’s a good schedule, it’s Monday through Fridays. You have the weekends for the family. At the time I started I had little kids,” Fernandez said. “It’s flexible because you have time for your family too.”

The various roles within custodial service are full-time and usually evening shift positions starting at $15 an hour with no experience. Fernandez added shifts usually start at 1 or 2 p.m., depending on the school, and end at 9:30 or 10:30 p.m.

At Marvin Ridge Elementary School, lead custodian Scotty Little said the daily shift is spent keeping hallways and classrooms clean for students and staff.

“It provides a clean and safe environment for the kids for learning, and I like working here because it’s given me an insight — keeping me abreast of what’s going on with young kids of the day, what’s being taught to our students,” Little said while taking a break from cleaning the hallway floor.

Little has spent a decade cleaning the halls of Marvin Ridge Middle, the first and only school he’s worked at in the county.

“I was working a job and I got ... I can say laid off, but they closed down Sears. Closed down, and I came here. Friend of mine recommended me come to work here,” Little recalled.

He, like Fernandez, started as a custodian, helping clean windows, vacuum floors and empty trash cans to keep classrooms tidy.

Ten years later he oversees a small staff of custodians at the school and said he enjoys it and has no plans to transfer closer to home in Monroe.

“The advancements was pretty quickly if you come to work, do what you’re supposed to do and mind your own business, you will get promoted. Advancements, as far as promotion and salary, within the last year we’ve had numerous bonuses and salaries. So, it’s ... I’m very appreciative of it,” Little said.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, school districts across the state are wrestling with decisions on raises, bonuses and incentives to retain non-certified staff members. In Union County, the UCPS school board already approved raises for staff like school bus drivers and food service workers and also provided retention bonuses during the school year. Other counties, including Mecklenburg, Stanly and Buncombe, have taken similar steps.

“Well it’s good benefits, it’s a good career, movement. You can work 20-25 years and have your retirement. Get a chance to meet new people, new teachers, and learn. I learn as the kids learn,” Little added.

And, Little said if you’re a parent like him it’s a good chance to get a front-row seat to what your children and their friends experience every school day.

This is not the first time UCPS has held career fairs to fill non-certified positions during the pandemic. Before last school year, it held an event to hire much-needed transportation employees. However, the district still had to make several changes to the bus program to cover shortages.

Summer Reading Contest Winner Week 5: On ‘One Small Step for Democracy in a “Live Free or Die” Town’

We received 1,147 entries from students from around the world for the fifth week of our 10-week Summer Reading Contest. Thank you to everyone who participated, and congratulations to our winner, Daniel Wei, as well as the ru...

We received 1,147 entries from students from around the world for the fifth week of our 10-week Summer Reading Contest. Thank you to everyone who participated, and congratulations to our winner, Daniel Wei, as well as the runners-up and honorable mentions we honor below.

Scroll down to take a look at the variety of topics — including the housing shortage, air pollution and robots in warehouses, as well as fatherhood, selfies, family recipes and Kendrick Lamar’s new album — that caught the eyes of our participants this week. You can find the work of all our winners since 2017 in this column.

Remember that you can participate any or every week this summer. Just check the top of our contest announcement to find the right place to submit your response, anytime from now until Aug. 19.

Winner

Daniel Wei, 15, from Marvin Ridge High School in Waxhaw, N.C., chose an article from the U.S. News section headlined “One Small Step for Democracy in a ‘Live Free or Die’ Town” and wrote:

What happened in Croydon, N.H., is happening all over America — people are realizing how little their voices matter. My civic literacy teacher has always urged us to get involved, to encourage our parents to vote, to actively support issues on social media and, eventually, to vote ourselves.

Many of my classmates, however, do not care about politics — but the parallels to Croydon reveal the perils of this approach. Croydonites passively allowed an outspoken political minority to make all decisions for them, leading to a halving of their school’s budget and the slashing of extracurricular activities. Today, we are seeing similar trends unfold on a national scale.

Take the recent Supreme Court decision to curb the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority to check emissions for power plants, which goes against the wishes of 80 percent of Pew-surveyed Americans. Perhaps we shouldn’t be surprised that one of the most conservative courts in American history would make a decision pandering only to its billionaire stakeholders rather than considering ordinary citizens.

So, how can we galvanize ourselves to rectify this mistake? Protesting could work, but it may not be enough. Instead, we must emulate the people of Croydon — who, through targeted community activism and patient participation in local government, were able to reverse their school’s budget cuts.

This E.P.A. ruling must be next on our list.

Runners-Up

In alphabetical order by the writer’s first name.

Honorable Mentions

Annie Liu on “Family Recipes Etched in Stone. Gravestone, That Is.

Cathleen on “How Gun Violence Changed My Father, Ronald Reagan, and Our Family

Grace on “Air Pollution Kills 10 Million People a Year. Why Do We Accept That as Normal?

Joyce on “Most Americans Say Life Is Starting to Return to Pre-Covid Normal, a Poll Shows

Shipley Earns Wuerffel Trophy Watch List Selection

Organizers for the Wuerffel Trophy announced today that running back Will Shipley has been named as one of 115 members on the 2022 watch list for the Wuerffel Trophy, presented annually in recognition of community service. In addition to being a frequent community servant in the Upstate through Clemson’s P.A.W. Journey initiative, Shipley recently fundraised and, in May, presented a $10,000 check to Levine Children’s Hospital in his...

Organizers for the Wuerffel Trophy announced today that running back Will Shipley has been named as one of 115 members on the 2022 watch list for the Wuerffel Trophy, presented annually in recognition of community service. In addition to being a frequent community servant in the Upstate through Clemson’s P.A.W. Journey initiative, Shipley recently fundraised and, in May, presented a $10,000 check to Levine Children’s Hospital in his home metro area of Charlotte.

Additional information from award organizers is included below. Visit the 2022 Preseason Honors hub for more preseason accolades garnered by Clemson.

ATLANTA – July 28, 2022 – The Wuerffel Trophy, College Football’s Premier Award for Community Service, today announced its watch list of 115 players from college football’s Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS).

Named after Danny Wuerffel, the 1996 Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback from the University of Florida, the Wuerffel Trophy is presented each February in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. The trophy honors college football players who serve others, celebrate their positive impact on society and inspire greater service in the world.

“I continue to be impressed with the number of college football players who are achieving on the field and still dedicating time to make a positive impact in their community,” said Wuerffel. “The student-athletes on this watch list are positively impacting organizations throughout the country.”

Nominations for the Wuerffel Trophy are made by the respective universities’ Sports Information Departments and will close on October 14. An up-to-date list of nominees can be found at www.wuerffeltrophy.org beginning on August 1. Semifinalists for the award will be announced on November 1, and finalists will be announced on November 22.

The formal announcement of the 2022 recipient is scheduled to be made on December 8, and the presentation of the 2022 Wuerffel Trophy will occur on February 24, 2023.

Past recipients of the award are Rudy Niswanger – LSU – 2005; Joel Penton – Ohio State – 2006; Paul Smith –Tulsa – 2007; Tim Tebow – Florida – 2008; Tim Hiller – Western Michigan – 2009; Sam Acho –Texas – 2010; Barrett Jones –Alabama – 2011; Matt Barkley – USC – 2012; Gabe Ikard –Oklahoma – 2013; Deterrian Shackelford – Ole Miss – 2014; Ty Darlington –Oklahoma – 2015; Trevor Knight – Texas – 2016; Courtney Love – Kentucky - 2017; Drue Tranquill – Notre Dame – 2018; Jon Wassink - Western Michigan– 2019; Teton Saltes –New Mexico – 2020; Isaiah Sanders – Stanford– 2021 .

NCFAAThe Wuerffel Trophy is a member of the National College Football Awards Association. The NCFAA encompasses the most prestigious awards in college football. Founded in 1997, the NCFAA and its 25 awards now boast over 800 recipients, dating to 1935. Visit ncfaa.org to learn more about our story.

NCFAA Watch List CalendarThe members of the NCFAA are unveiling preseason watch lists over a two-week period. Sixteen of the association’s 25 awards are presenting their preseason watch list during this time as the NCFAA has spearheaded a coordinated effort to promote each award’s preseason candidates. Following is the 2022 preseason watch list calendar:

Mon., July 18: Maxwell AwardTues., July 19: Davey O’Brien AwardWed., July 20: Doak Walker AwardThurs., July 21: Biletnikoff AwardFriday, July 22: John Mackey Award/Rimington Trophy

Mon., July 25: Paycom Jim Thorpe Award/Butkus AwardTues., July 26: Outland Trophy/Bronko Nagurski TrophyWed., July 27: Lou Groza Award/Ray Guy AwardThurs., July 28: Hornung Award/Wuerffel TrophyFriday, July 29: Walter Camp Award

Mon., Aug. 1: Bednarik Award

Printable calendar:http://ncfaa.org/22watchlist_calendar.pdf

The Wuerffel Trophy is supported by its corporate partners Dart Container Corporation/Solo Cup and Herff Jones.

ABOUT THE WUERFFEL TROPHYEstablished in 2005, the Wuerffel Trophy honors college football players who serve others, celebrate their impact, and inspire greater service in the world. A member of the National College Football Awards Association, the Wuerffel Trophy is presented annually to the FBS player who best combines exemplary community service with leadership achievement on and off the field. It is the first major award honoring the character of service to others.

The Wuerffel Trophy is named after Heisman Trophy winner, College Football Hall of Famer, former NFL quarterback, and renowned humanitarian Danny Wuerffel, whose life mission is to inspire greater service in the world. Wuerffel led the University of Florida to four SEC Championships and the Gators’ first National Football Championship as the team’s star quarterback. The 1996 Heisman Trophy winner set 17 NCAA and Florida records and won a myriad of other awards including the Maxwell Award, the Davey O’Brien Award, and The William V. Campbell Trophy, presented to the nation’s top scholar-athlete. As a nationally recognized humanitarian, Wuerffel inspires leaders to use their influence to make a positive Impact and currently serves as President of the Wuerffel Foundation.

Player, University, Year, PositionJordan Battle, Alabama, Sr., DBMiller Gibbs, Appalachian State, Sr., TEJordan Morgan, Arizona , So., OLCase Hatch, Arizona State, Sr., RB/TECam Little, Arkansas, So., KEddie Smith, Arkansas State, Jr., DBMarquel Broughton, Army, Sr., DBNick Brahms, Auburn, Sr., OLBrandon Martin, Ball State, Sr., LBBen Sims, Baylor, Sr., TEJohn Ojukwu, Boise State, Sr., OLTaji Johnson, Boston College. Jr., WRAustin Osborne, Bowling Green, Sr., WRMatt McDonald, Bowling Green, Sr., QBMax Michel, Buffalo, Sr., DLTyler Batty, BYU, So., DLMatthew Cindric, Cal, Sr., OLTrey Paster, Cal, Jr., LBKendrick Blake Jr., Charlotte, Jr., WRWilson Huber, Cincinnati, Sr., LBWill Shipley, Clemson, So., RBJoshka Gustav, Colorado, So., LBA’Jon Vivens, Colorado State, Sr., RBDeWayne Carter, Duke, Jr., DLHolton Ahlers, East Carolina, Sr., QBTariq Speights, Eastern Michigan, Sr., LBShykieim Pace, FIU, So., DLNay’Quan Wright, Florida, Jr., RBDillan Gibbons, Florida State, Sr., OLJalen Cropper, Fresno State, Sr., WRKearis Jackson, Georgia, Sr., WR/STMyles Sims, Georgia Tech, Jr., DBJonah Kahahawai-Welch, Hawai’i, Sr., DLDonavan Mutin, Houston, Sr., LBTailon Leitzsey, Illinois, Sr., DBJack Tuttle, Indiana, Sr., QBAnthony Johnson Jr., Iowa State, Sr., DBSam Burt, Kansas, Sr., DLWill Howard, Kansas State, Jr., QBIsaac Vance, Kent State, Sr., WRJalen Geiger, Kentucky, Jr., DBChris Smith, Louisiana, Jr., RBJoshua Mote, Louisiana Tech, Sr., OLAli Gaye, LSU, Sr., DLMike Jones Jr., LSU, Sr., LBRasheen Ali, Marshall, So., RBTyriek Bell, Marshall, Sr., LBAnthony Pecorella, Maryland, Sr., PQuindell Johnson, Memphis, Sr., DBClay James, Miami, Jr., LSBlake Corum, Michigan, Jr., RBTre Mosley, Michigan State, Sr., WRJordan Ferguson, Middle Tennessee, Sr., DLTanner Morgan, Minnesota, Sr., QBAustin Williams, Mississippi State, Sr., WRBarrett Banister, Missouri, Sr., WRBijan Nichols, Navy, Sr., KChristopher Toudle, NC State, Jr., TEEthan Piper, Nebraska, Jr., OLChristian Swint, Nevada , Sr., DBLuke Wysong, New Mexico, So., WRCarson Pharris, New Mexico State, So., OLNick Rattin, Northern Illinois, Jr., LBJack Kiser, Notre Dame, Jr., LBKam Babb, Ohio State, Jr. WRMarvin Mims, Oklahoma, Jr., WRBrendon Evers, Oklahoma State, Sr., DLB.R. Hatcher, Old Dominion, Jr., LSKD Hill , Ole Miss, Sr., DLAlex Austin, Oregon State, So., DBSean Clifford, Penn State, Sr., QBDeslin Alexandre, Pittsburgh, Sr., DLAidan O’Connell, Purdue, Sr., QBIkenna Enechukwu, Rice, Jr., DLMayan Ahanotu, Rutgers, Sr., DLMichael Shawcroft, San Diego State, Sr., LBChevan Cordeiro, San Jose State, Jr., QBTerrance Newman, SMU, Sr., DLKeith Gallmon Jr., South Alabama, Sr., DBMarShawn Lloyd, South Carolina, So., RBSwayze Bozeman, Southern Miss, Sr., LBJohn Humphreys, Stanford, Jr., WRPatrick Fields, Stanford, Sr., DBTanner McKee, Stanford, Jr., QBAaron Bolinsky, Syracuse, Sr., LSAndrew Coker, TCU, Jr., OLIsaac Moore, Temple, Sr., OLJacob Warren, Tennessee, Sr., TEBijan Robinson, Texas, Jr., RBLayden Robinson, Texas A&M, Jr., OLMicah Hilts, Texas State, Jr., TETony Bradford Jr., Texas Tech, Sr., DLMitchell Berg, Toledo, Sr., OLCraig Slocum Jr., Troy, Sr., DBNick Anderson, Tulane, Sr., LBDavis Brin, Tulsa, Sr., QBSidney Wells, UAB, Sr., OLIsaiah Bowser, UCF, Sr. , RBChase Griffin, UCLA, Jr., QBRobert Burns, UConn, Sr., RBEllis Merriweather, UMass, Sr., RBCaleb Williams, USC, So., QBAntonio Grier, USF, Sr., LBDalton Kincaid, Utah, Sr., TEAndre Grayson, Utah State, Sr., DBDeion Hankins, UTEP, So., RBFrank Harris, UTSA, Sr., QBBen Bresnahan, Vanderbilt, Sr., TEChayce Chalmers, Virginia, Jr., DBIsaiah Chaney, Wake Forest, So., DLAlex Cook, Washington, Sr., DBTravion Brown, Washington State, Jr., LBZach Frazier, West Virginia, Jr., OLJuwuan Jones, Western Kentucky, Sr., DLBoone Bonnema, Western Michigan, So., LB

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
logo

Copyright 2022 by Dr. Mickey Barber's Better Life

Service Areas :