GAINSWave® Treatment in Pineville, NC

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Few things are guaranteed in life, but there is one thing that you can count on for sure: as time goes on, your body is going to age. While most men in their late teens through their twenties might feel invincible, it's only a matter of time before age starts to play a role in everyday life. Injuries take longer to recover from, hangovers take longer to dissipate, aches and pains become a normal part of life, and intimate time with your partner can be compromised. If you have experienced any of the symptoms above, don't worry - it's completely normal to slow down as you get older.

The question is, what are you going to do about the aging process? For years, men were told to just "live with it," but in 2021, those days are over. The time to fight back is here, and there has never been a better opportunity to live your best life than now. Nobody understands the effects that aging can have on men but our team of professionals at Better Life do. That is why we invest all of our time developing innovative, effective men's health solutions: to give men a chance to change their future and live like they did while they were in their prime. If you're ready to take a stand against ED and live a more energetic, youthful life, know that you're not alone. At Better Life Carolinas, we are here to help by providing the most scientifically advanced treatments on the market today.

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GAINSWave® Treatment In Pineville, NC

When it comes to men's health, the topic of sex can still feel taboo, especially when there are performance issues involved. At Better Life Carolinas, we have heard just about every story you can imagine regarding erectile dysfunction or ED. So if you're embarrassed and angry about your performance in the bedroom, we understand how you're feeling. In the past, men had to take strange drugs or sign off on expensive surgeries to help correct their ED, adding to their feelings of shame and hopelessness.

The good news? If you're a man dealing with ED, you don't have to settle for antiquated treatments like those referenced above. There's a new product on the block: a revolutionary, non-invasive treatment that is the first of it's kind. It's called GAINSWave®, and you can bet your bottom dollar that it isn't like anything else you have tried before.

Unlike most ED treatments, this unique approach does not require drugs or surgery. Instead, it relies on high-frequency acoustic waves to open the penis's existing blood vessels, encouraging the growth of new blood vessels while eliminating micro-plaque. To put it simply, GAINSWave® increases blood flow and gives you a chance to reclaim your libido and live life like a man in his prime.

GAINSWave® isn't a sketchy, quick-fix pill found behind the glass at a gas station. It is a comprehensive erectile dysfunction treatment with an incredible 76% success rate. With virtually no side effects, it's no wonder that men throughout the Carolinas and across the United States trust GAINSWave® to solve their ED and Peyronie's disease problems.

GainsWave Treatment Pineville, NC  Emsella Chair Pineville, NC

How GAINSWave® Works

It might sound like GAINSWave® is too good to be true, but the fact is this kind of erectile dysfunction treatment in Pineville, NC uses scientifically-backed, time-tested technologies and applications to improve male sexual performance. Technically referred to as Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy (LI-ESWT), our GAINSWave® procedure goes right to the crux of the issue. Low-intensity sound waves break up plaque formation in your penis while stimulating new blood vessel growth. These new blood vessels help get more blood to your penis, ultimately improving your ability to perform. This incredible treatment not only increases blood flow - it also causes new nerve tissues to grow, making your penis more sensitive and easily stimulated.

It all happens through a process called neurogenesis, which increases penis sensitivity. What sets GAINSWave® apart from others is the use of low-intensity sound waves to achieve increased blood flow and sensitivity. Because this procedure is completely non-invasive, you won't ever have to worry about expensive insurance claims or unsightly scarring. All you have to worry about is enjoying life like you used to, without having to undergo surgery or putting harmful substances in your body.

Here are some quick facts about Better Life Carolinas GAINSWave® treatments:

  • For most men, you can expect to have between 6 and 12 GAINSWave® sessions
  • Sessions typically take 15 to 20 minutes.
  • GAINSWave® works by releasing growth factors in your penis tissue, which generates new blood vessels.
  • GAINSWave® promotes healthy blood flow by breaking up plaque formation, giving men harder, stronger erections for longer periods of time.
  • GAINSWave® also activates dormant stem cells, which leads to new cell growth in men.

Hidden Risks of Prescription Erectile Dysfunction Treatment

If you have ever wondered why GAINSWave® treatments are so popular with men, the answer is simple. Prescription drugs meant to help ED often come with side effects that can diminish your peace of mind and day-to-day life. While some men swear by the "little blue pill," many guys aren't aware of the hidden risks associated with drugs like Viagra. The following ailments can happen both in the short term and long term:

  • Back Pain
  • Muscle Pain
  • Headaches
  • Vision Loss
  • Rashes
  • Respiratory Issues
  • Hearing Loss
  • Dizziness
  • Upset Stomach
  • Ringing in Ears
  • Fever
 VIVEVE Pineville, NC

If you are having problems with erectile dysfunction, you should understand why it's happening. The primary cause of ED is associated with a lack of blood flow to the penis, making erections difficult to get and maintain. Rather than relying on a prescription pill for a quick fix, many men are using GAINSWave® treatment in Pineville, NC for a natural solution with no ill side effects. ED doesn't have to be your "new normal," and neither does suffering from strange side effects from popping too many "little blue pills."

GAINSWave®, COVID-19, and ED

The global COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound effect on the world. Over the last year, millions of Americans have had to change their lifestyles and alter daily routines to better protect themselves and their loved ones from the virus. While COVID-19 causes a litany of negative side effects, new research shows that men who contract the virus can triple their risk of developing erectile dysfunction. Because the human body is unfamiliar with this kind of virus, it responds by sending a large immune response. During this process, the body uses massive amounts of chemicals to eliminate the virus, causing horrible collateral damage in the form of cell destruction and inflammation.

 Shockwave Therapy Pineville, NC

Contracting COVID-19 and suffering from ED at the same time might sound like a death sentence. However, if you are a man experiencing ED during or after contracting the COVID-19 virus, don't lose hope.

Clinical trials have shown that shockwave therapy, better known as GAINSWave®, has been shown to lower inflammation and boost vascularity by creating angiogenesis and improving endothelial function. Simply put, GAINSWave® treatments can help reverse symptoms of ED brought on by COVID-19. To learn more about how GAINSWave® can help you get back to a normal sex life after developing COVID-19, we recommend contacting our office today.

GAINSWave®: A Natural, Non-Invasive Treatment for Peyronie's Disease

Though Peyronie's Disease affects about 9% of men, it is a little-known disease that can cause physical and aesthetic issues. It is characterized by fibrous scar tissue, which forms underneath the surface of a man's penis. When this disease is left untreated or treated improperly, it can be very difficult for men to have a normal erection. This is because Peyronie's Disease can cause painful curvatures in the penis, making it nearly impossible for afflicted men to have sexual intercourse at all.

The cause of Peyronie's Disease is currently unknown. However, most cases stem from physical trauma like acute injuries after vigorous sex. Other causes include prostate surgery, autoimmune disorders, and family history. Unfortunately, traditional treatment options range from a "wait and see" approach to prescription drugs and even surgery.

Symptoms and signs of Peyronie's Disease include:

  • Erectile Dysfunction: Men with this disease may have problems achieving or maintaining erections.
  • Misshapen Penis: Some men with this disease suffer from a narrowing of the penis when erect, resembling an hourglass shape.
  • Notable Bend in Penis: One of the most common symptoms of Peyronie's Disease includes significant penis curvature, which is defined by a severe and unnatural bend.
  • Scar Tissue: A common symptom of this disease is bands of tissue or hard lumps underneath the skin of the penis.
  • Shortened Penis: Some men with this disease have reported a reduction in penis length.
  • Pain in Penis: Peyronie's has the potential to cause pain in a man's penis, regardless of whether he has an erection or not.
 Hormone Replacement Therapy Pineville, NC

Fortunately, for men who are looking for a non-invasive, natural erectile dysfunction treatment in Pineville, NC GAINSWave® is the answer. Using low-strength soundwaves or shockwaves, GAINSWave® treatment in Pineville breaks down scar tissue affecting your penis, helps create new blood vessels, and opens up existing ones. As a result, blood flow is increased, which minimizes penis curvature and fixes the problems associated with erectile dysfunction.

P-Shot® Erectile Dysfunction Treatment in Pineville, NC

Most guys will tell you that their penis is the most important part of their body. While that is not totally true from a physiological perspective, we get where they're coming from - after all, a man's penis plays a big role in his personal life and overall wellbeing. When a man has problems achieving and maintaining an erection, his quality of life can suffer dramatically, resulting in lower self-esteem and even depression. If you are a man and suffering from ED or Peyronie's Disease, you can rest easy knowing help is only a phone call away.

 Testosterone Replacement Therapy Pineville, NC

In addition to GAINSWave® treatments, Better Life Carolinas also offers the Priapus Shot or P-Shot® for short. Originally used to treat wounds and sports injuries, our P-Shot® is an all-natural treatment that fortifies your body through cellular repair and rejuvenation. P-Shot® treatments have shown very promising results for men who have suffered from prostate cancer, enlarged prostates, the side effects of surgery, drug side effects from prescription pain killers, and even diabetes.

You might be asking yourself, "How does the P-Shot® work?"

This ED solution works by using platelet-rich plasma or PRP from your own body. The proteins and growth factors released by the large number of platelets activate your stem cells, which begins cellular regeneration and repair wherever the PRP are used in your body. Tissue repair in your penis is further aided by the formation of new blood vessels and collagen production.

In many cases, men who use the P-Shot® to correct erectile dysfunction or the effects of Peyronie's Disease can resume sexual activity a few hours after the treatment is applied.

Benefits of Better Life Carolinas' P-Shot® include:

  • Increased blood flow to the penis
  • Improved stamina during sexual activities
  • Improvement and possible resolution of penile curvature issues caused by Peyronie's Disease
  • Increased penis sensitivity
  • Improvements to penis girth and length

For more information about the Priapus Shot or to find out if this treatment is right for you, schedule your free consultation today.

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Latest News in Pineville, NC

Super G Mart expansion will feature international food hall and cultural hub

The North Carolina grocery retailer is getting ready to open a third location in Pineville, seeing growth in the local Asian community.PINEVILLE, N.C. — While Charlotte has become one of the fastest-growing cities in the country, a North Carolina grocery retailer is also expanding.The Korean-owned Super G Mart on Independence Boulevard has already seen its customer base increase, and the owners believe now is the time to go big.Peter Han, one...

The North Carolina grocery retailer is getting ready to open a third location in Pineville, seeing growth in the local Asian community.

PINEVILLE, N.C. — While Charlotte has become one of the fastest-growing cities in the country, a North Carolina grocery retailer is also expanding.

The Korean-owned Super G Mart on Independence Boulevard has already seen its customer base increase, and the owners believe now is the time to go big.

Peter Han, one of the owners of Super G Mart, said many customers drive by their soon-to-be third location in Pineville. It's going in the building that used to be a Big Kmart.

"I think right now is a good time for people who are interested in stepping outside of their comfort zone a little bit, and trying some other flavors," Han said.

A 25,000 square foot food hall will serve authentic Thai, Korean, Vietnamese, Indian and Japanese cuisines, to name a few.

"We're trying to create a cultural hub," Han said. "There's going to be language classes, cooking classes for customers that might not be familiar with some of our ingredients."

The 108,000 square foot space will also allow for a roomier layout with wider aisles. Han said, "We're an international grocery store, so we want customers to feel like they're traveling through different regions at every aisle that they go to."

The "G" stands for global, so Super G Mart will carry Caribbean and Latin foods, in addition to plenty of hard-to-find Asian ingredients. Fish will be sourced locally, as well as flown in. There will also be a 16-foot double-decker live fish tank.

"Generally, in South Charlotte and around this area, there is a pretty heavily dominant Asian community," Han said.

He also said easy access from I-485 and Pineville-Matthews Road was a factor when selecting a site.

"I don't think we were expecting to go this big, but I think it turned out to be a good idea so we can differentiate ourselves," he explained.

Han said the opening has been pushed back to August due to supply chain issues holding up some of the necessary equipment for the store and tenants.

Once things are up and running, Han said another goal is to partner with local organizations to host international events and festivals in their parking lot.

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Investigation continues after massive Pineville apartment fire destroys multiple units

This article has 222 words with a read time of approximately 1 minute and 6 seconds.PINEVILLE, N.C. (WBTV) – More than a dozen peoples’ homes were destroyed following a massive apartment fire in Pineville.Investigators are still working to figure out what led to the large fire early Monday morning that impacted 16 units.Crews were called to the fire at The Park at Caterina on Plum Creek Lane very close to Atrium Health Pineville and Interstate 485 around midnight. The...

This article has 222 words with a read time of approximately 1 minute and 6 seconds.

PINEVILLE, N.C. (WBTV) – More than a dozen peoples’ homes were destroyed following a massive apartment fire in Pineville.

Investigators are still working to figure out what led to the large fire early Monday morning that impacted 16 units.

Crews were called to the fire at The Park at Caterina on Plum Creek Lane very close to Atrium Health Pineville and Interstate 485 around midnight. The fire was under control as of 5:30 a.m. Monday.

Authorities got the call about flames coming out of the roof around midnight. Several different units with the Charlotte Fire Department responded.

Pelika Ivey says it was like a scene out of a movie, except it was her life and she was watching her home go up in flames.

“I woke up at 11:45, eating my Jersey Mikes, just looking at The Longest Yard by Adam Sandler, and I hear that beeping noise 5 or 10 times,” Ivey said.

She says the smoke alarm sent her running outside.

“Before you know it, within matters of seconds, it was in flames,” she said. “It blew up in my room.”

Ivey and another neighbor jumped into action.

Investigators are still working to figure out what led to the large fire early Monday morning that impacted 16 units.

“We’re knocking on peoples doors let’s get everybody out,” she siad. “Let’s call the cops.”

Everyone made it out alive, but most lost everything.

The Red Cross is assisting 17 people.

“A safe place to stay for the night as well as food or whatever those immediate needs are,” Allison Taylor, Regional Executive with the Red Cross, said.

Ivey is still focusing on the good.

“We can’t save everything,” she said. “But we saved everybody. That’s it.”

The property managers also told WBTV they are working to move some people into empty units on the property.

According to Medic, there were no transports from the fire. First responders said they pulled everyone out of the impacted building.

“We’re prideful of the job that our people did because … you know midnight the fire was well ahead of us. We were able to extinguish the fire with no injury to any civilians, no injuries to any firefighters,” Pineville Fire Chief Michael Gerin said.

Crews said several were treated for smoke inhalation as well.

Copyright 2021 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Public Records for Week of July 14, 2022

Land TransfersThe following land transfers were filed with the Davie Register of Deeds, listed by parties involved, acreage, location and deed stamps purchased, with $2 representing $1,000. nting $1,000.– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, .62 acre, Fulton Township.– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, tracts.– Easystreet Properties to DME Elite Properties, 12.73 acres, Milling Road, Mocksville, $712.– Thom...

Land Transfers

The following land transfers were filed with the Davie Register of Deeds, listed by parties involved, acreage, location and deed stamps purchased, with $2 representing $1,000. nting $1,000.

– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, .62 acre, Fulton Township.

– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, tracts.

– Easystreet Properties to DME Elite Properties, 12.73 acres, Milling Road, Mocksville, $712.

– Thomas Murphy Hooker Jr. to Caroline S. Harrell and James L. Springer Jr., 5.01 acres, Peoples Creek Road, Advance, $1,400.

– Scott A. Jackson and Heather L. Jackson to Joseph Michael Robinson, Brianna Irene Lookabill and Amber Jay Link, 1 acre, Pineville Road, Farmington, $260.

– HPA II Borrower 2019-1 to Eugene Wayne Faircloth and Heather Nicole Johnson, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance, $700.

– Michael T. Munley to Gerald L. Blout and Carolyn S. Blout, 1 villa, Oak Valley, Advance, $890.

– Stephanie Moore Boyce to Jacob Neil and Holly Whitfield, .9 acre, Shady Grove Township, $652.

– Victoria Pless to Joyce B. Bullard, tract, Farmington Township, $356.

– Third Generation Homes to Malcolm Marks and Sharon Marks, 1 lot, Myers Ridge, $1,050.

– Comfort Quality Homes to Aaron L. Hopping and Dannielle C. Hopping, .47 acre, Mocksville Township, $470.

– Charles A. Elmore and Linda D. Elmore to Kevin Mabe and Sherry Mabe, .8 acre, $40.

– Jay S. Matlock to David Lee Dodder and Melissa Dawn Dodder, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance, $900.

– Sherman Desi Arnold to Michael Seamon and Virginia Seamon, 1 lot, Craftwood, Mocksville, $150.

– D.R. Horton Inc. to Kathy Lynn Atkins and Debra Jane Parsons, 1 lot, Highland Place, $564.

– D.R. Horton Inc. to Ruben Gallegos and Christine Melissa Gallegos, 1 lot, Highland Place, $624.

– Earnhardt and Russ Builders to Sue Earnhardt, 1 lot, Jerusalem Township.

– Dalton Realty to Clarence L. Dalton III and Alice P. Dalton, 2.4 acres, Fulton Township.

– Anthony J. Cameron Sr. and Robin Elaine Cameron to Anthony J. Cameron II, 1 lot, Farmington Township.

– Reverse Mortgage Funding to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, 1 lot, Fieldcrest Subdivision.

– Wilmington Savings Fund to Rosa Elva Santiago Martinez and Alejandro Mejia Bustos, 1 lot, Fieldcrest Subdivision, $230.

– Angela Warner, trustee to Cameron Warner, part of 2 lots, Mocksville Township.

– Jeffery Eaton and Ann Eaton to Larry Preston Dishmond, 1 lot, Sheffield Acres, Clarksville Township, $613.

– Vanessa Berrios to Anibal Tomas Pestamo-Aguilo, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance.

– Wanda Jean Bailey and Bruce Bailey, Mitchell Loren Wolford and Carla L. Wolford, and Michael Lawrence Wolford and Dale Lee Wolford to Sigifredo Acevedo Gama and Jazmine Acevedo, tracts, Jerusalem Township, $376.

– Mitchell L. Link and Stephanie Link to MCM Holdings SC, 1 lot, Jerusalem Township, $216.

– Angela Dawn Tedder to Angela Dawn Tedder and Jason Christopher Tedder, 3 lots, Woodland Subdivision, Mocksville Township.

– Brenda Joyner Legg to Angela Dawn Tedder, 1 villa, Milling Way, Mocksville.

– Zoobie Holdings to Michael H. Forman and Stephanie T. Forman, trustees, .87 acre, Kinderton Place, Farmington Township, $2,750.

– Julianne O. Hanes to Joseph M. Miles and Jane V. Miles, 10.13 acres, $530.

– James C. Winchester IV to FKH SFR Propco K, 1 lot, Redland Way, Farmington Township, $845.

– Christopher Andrew Vest and Stephanie Myers Vest to Kenneth S. White, .52 acre, $30.

– Grace Smith Hoots to Jamie Richard White and Wendi Jones White, .25 acre, Calahaln Township.

– Grace Smith Hoots to Jamie R. White and Melissa W. Hill, tract, Calahaln Township.

– Jacob Nisley to Ragland Holdings, 1.78 acres, Calahaln Township, $490.

– Bobby Joe McDaniels and Deborah S. McDaniels to Sujit Naik, tract, Pineville Road, Farmington, $40.

– Marklin Family Properties to Neil R. Menius, 3 lots, Mocksville Township, $40.

– Barry Dean Hauser to Barry Dean Hauser and Kristy Diane Owens, 1.65 acres.

– Charles S. King and Chantal King to ABCS Holdings, tracts, Mocksville Township, $374.

– Braxton Real Estate and Development to D.R. Horton Inc., tracts, Highlands Place, $2,697.

– Lena Renee Makas and Jerry Wayne Makas to Carlos Villatoro Bonilla, tracts, Jerusalem Township, $276.

Arrests

The following were arrested by the Davie County Sheriff’s Office.

July 9: Marlene Odili Alvarenga Medina, 32, of E. Lake Drive, Mocksville, fleeing to elude arrest in a vehicle, reckless driving, DWI, driving left of center, misdemeanor child abuse.

July 8: Debora Renae Osborne, 63, of Juney Beauchamp Road, Advance, misuse of 911 system.

July 7: James Timothy Benfield, 46, of Hamptonville, failure to appear in court; Damien Botteon, 54, of Salisbury, failure to appear in court; Derrick Deangelo Jones, 57, of Marconi St., Mocksville, second-degree sexual offense; Douglas Lee Little, 36, of US 601 N., Mocksville, probation violations, failure to appear in court; Mandie Michelle O’Neal, 47, of Creason Road, Mocksville, felony probation violation; James Joshua Rogers, 42, of Juniors Way, Mocksville, breaking, entering and larceny.

July 6: Michael Wayne Horne, 40, of Salisbury, failure to appear in court; Amy Lynn Lilly, 46, of Duke St., Cooleemee, communicating threats; Christopher James Saul, 47 of Ruffin, failure to appear in court.

July 5: Michael Eugene Jackson, 25, of Mt. Airy, breaking, entering and larceny; Phillip Craig Robertson, 45, of Yadkinville, larceny; Cody Scott Tharpe, 35, of S. Main St., Mocksville, violation of court order.

Sheriff’s Office

The following are from Davie County Sheriff’s Office reports.

July 9: domestic disturbance, NC 801 S., Advance; disturbing the peace, Mountview Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 64 W., Mocksville; domestic disturbance, NC 801 S., Mocksville; fireworks, Deer Run Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Thousand Trails Drive, Advance; disturbance, W. Kinderton Way, Bermuda Run; larceny, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, NC 801 S., Mocksville; larceny, Cooper Creek DRive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 601 S., Mocksville; suspicious package, Beauchamp Road, Advance; trespassing, Wall St., Mocksville; harassment, US 601 S., Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Pepperstone Place, Mocksville; larceny, Ivy Circle, Bermuda Run; damage to property, US 601 S., Mocksville; suspicious activity, FArmington Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Mr. Henry Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Meadowview Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Four Corners Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Legion Hut Road, Mocksvile; suspicious activity, Martin Luther King Jr. Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 64 W., Mocksville.

July 8: suspicious activity, Speaks Road, Advance; disturbance, US 158, Bermuda Run; harassment, Bridgewater Drive, Bermuda Run; fraud, Crepe Myrtle Lane, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Junction Road, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Duke St., Cooleemee; larceny, James Road, Advance; disturbance, Northridge Court, Advance; assault, Willhaven Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Swicegood St., Mocksville; disturbance, Juney Beauchamp Road, Advance; suspicious activity, Salisbury Road, Mocksville.

July 7: domestic disturbance, Creekside Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, N. Main St., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Eastcoast Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; harassmetn, Watt St., Cooleemee; domestic assist, Nolley Road, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Casa Bella Drive, Advance; trespassing, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; trespassing, Galadrim Way, Advance; larceny, Madison Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Northridge Court, Mocksville; disturbance, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; harassment, W. Kinderton Way, Bermuda Run; disturbance, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; assault, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; disturbance, W. Brickwalk Court, Mocksville; harassment, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; burglary, Redland Road, Mocksville; runaway, Shutt Road, Advance; suspicious activity, Meadowview Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Will Boone Road, Mocksville.

July 6: suspicious activity, US 64 W., Mcoksville; larceny, Woodlee Drive, Advance; disturbance, Calvin Lane, Mocksville; domestic assist, Golfview Drive, Bermuda Run; disturbance, Gladstone Road, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Milling Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Hospital St., Mocksville; fraud, North Forke Drive, Bermuda Run; larceny, NC 801 S., Cooleemee; suspicious activity, Abbey Lane, Mocksville; fraud, E. Depot St., Mocksville; burglary, Powell Road, Mocksville; larceny, Fireside Lane, Mocksville; larceny, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; suspicious activity, Pointe House Lane, Mocksville; larceny, Sheffield Road, Harmony; suspiciuos activity, US 64 W., Mocksville; suspicious package, Government Center Drive, Mocksville.

July 5: suspicious activity, Cummings Lane, Mocksville; harassment, Speer Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Fairfield Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Guinevere Lane, Mocksville; disturbance, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; damage to property, US 64 E., Mcoksville; damage to property, Clark Road, Mocksville; larceny, Elrica Lane, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mcoksville; fraud, N. Main St., Mocksville; larceny, NC 801 S., Bermuda Run; harassment, Boxwood Church Road, Mocksville; harassment, Fulton Road, Advance; suspicious activity, N. Main St., Mocksville; larceny, Underpass Road, Advance; suspicious activity, N. Main St., Mocksville; harassment, Hobson Drive, Mocksville.

July 4: fireworks, Kelly Ave., Mocksville; fireworks, Childrens Home Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Dutchman Trail, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Farmington Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Shiloh Court, Mocksville; suspicioius activity, Allen Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Underpass Road, Advance; fireworks, Riverbend Drive, Bermuda Run; fireworks, Ponderosa Drive, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; fireworks, Bermuda Run Drive, Bermuda Run; larceny, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; fraud, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; larceny, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; fraud, US 64 E., Mocksville; disturbance, Creason Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Madison Road, Mocksville; larceny, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; disturbance, Juney Beauchamp Road, Advance; fraud, Bing Crosby Blvd., Bermuda Run; damage to property, Boone Lane, Mocksville; suspicious activity, I-40MM170, Mocksville; larceny, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; fireworks, Sain Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Will Boone Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Marginal St., Cooleemee; fireworks, NC 801 S., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Fox Trot Lane, Mocksville; fireworkds, Camden Point Court, Mocksville; fireworks, Pointe House Lane, Mocksville; fireworks, Underpass Road, Advance; disturbance, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Cana Road, Mocksville; fireworks, Bermuda Village Drive, Bermuda Run; suspicious activity, I-40 MM 177; noise complaint, Dutchman Trail, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Hobson Drive, Mocksville.

July 3: suspicious activity, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; larceny, NC 801 N., Bermuda Run; suspicious activity, US 601 N., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; damage to property, US 601 S., Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Mullins Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cornatzer Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Ijames Church Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 601 N., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Hobson Drive, Mocksville;p fireworks, Foxdale Court, Mocksville; noise complaint, Mountview Drive, Mocksville; disturbance, Watt St., Cooleemee.

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'A cup filling experience' | Federal team brought in to help at Atrium preparing to leave

The 16-person team brought in by the Department of Health and Human Services has been a critical resource as the omicron surge falls.PINEVILLE, N.C. — COVID-19 hospitalizations are finally starting to come down slowly, but at the height of the omicron surge, North Carolina saw several hospitalization records set and then broken the next day.Healthcare workers were stretched so thin, ...

The 16-person team brought in by the Department of Health and Human Services has been a critical resource as the omicron surge falls.

PINEVILLE, N.C. — COVID-19 hospitalizations are finally starting to come down slowly, but at the height of the omicron surge, North Carolina saw several hospitalization records set and then broken the next day.

Healthcare workers were stretched so thin, Atrium Health and NCDHHS put in a request for federal help. The Department of Health and Human Services sent a 16-person team at the start of the month.

Healthcare systems everywhere were hit hard during the omicron surge. Locally, hospitals had the highest patient counts of the entire pandemic. Atrium officials say its Pineville location stood out as having the greatest need, and the federal help relieved some of that pressure.

Sometimes even the helpers need a hand.

“The frontlines of healthcare, I think, is exhausted and tired," Marc Scherschel, the team commander for the HHS disaster medical assistance team, said. "But they’re still in the fight, they’re still coming to work, and they’re still taking care of people."

Omicron spread at lightning speed, filling hospital beds and temporarily sidelining doctors and nurses, leading the state and Atrium Health to ask the federal government for reinforcements. On Feb. 1, a disaster medical assistance team made up of healthcare workers that have been deployed in hospitals around the country was brought in, led by Scherschel.

“The challenges are the same," he said. "It’s the number of patients coming to a facility, number of patients who need to be admitted to that facility, what their length of stay in that facility is."

Their help has cut wait times in the emergency department, leading to a trickle-down effect in the entire hospital.

Dr. Sheela Myers, the vice president and chief medical officer at Atrium in Pineville, said it’s been a critical resource.

“The psychological impact on the team is such an incredible lift," Myers said. "So not just having help, but having the help of highly trained, skilled clinicians come in and join the team, a team that knows very well the many faces of what this pandemic has done."

It's an impact everyone involved will continue to feel as metrics move in the right direction.

“It’s a cup filling experience for me, not a cup draining," Scherschel said. "You get tired and you work hard, and you have long hours, you flip your schedules and travel and you’re away from family. Those things are all detractors, but it really means a lot to all of us to be able to help another community.”

The federal team leaves on Sunday. Atrium officials said while beds are still relatively full, now that metrics are falling, they’re confident we’re moving in the right direction and the patient load will be more manageable.

New Pineville school immerses all students in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English

Inside a newly-renovated building in a Pineville shopping center, you’ll hear young children learning in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English.ILIM School, short for the International Language Immersion Montessori School, offers a new twist on a growing educational option. Language immersion means classes are conducted in the language students are trying to learn.ILIM students also learn about global cultures. Dina Ahmed, Arabic teacher who came fro...

Inside a newly-renovated building in a Pineville shopping center, you’ll hear young children learning in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English.

ILIM School, short for the International Language Immersion Montessori School, offers a new twist on a growing educational option. Language immersion means classes are conducted in the language students are trying to learn.

ILIM students also learn about global cultures. Dina Ahmed, Arabic teacher who came from Dubai, recently told her students about the drummer in many Arabic-speaking countries who awakens people before dawn during Ramadan, when Muslims fast between sunrise and sunset.

"In Arabic we would say, ‘Esha ya nayem,’ " she said, clapping to demonstrate the rhythm. "This means, 'Wake up, everyone asleep, just wake up to eat something and then just off to work!' "

She offers the English translation only when the children aren’t in the room. When they’re present she speaks only in Arabic, using props and body language to help them understand.

Immersion is booming

As strange as that may seem to many adults, it’s an increasingly common experience for children, says Donna Podgorny. She’s an officer in a national network of language immersion educators and works for Union County Public Schools.

"It’s just really exploded exponentially in the last 15, 20 years because people have seen the great benefits of learning another language," Podgorny said.

Last year the American Councils for International Education tallied more than 3,600 public schools in America offering language immersion, including 229 in North Carolina.

Union County, for instance, offers Spanish and Mandarin. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools offers dual-immersion programs, where students learn in English half the day and Spanish the other half. That’s fairly common across the country.

CMS also has a magnet school that offers immersion in four world languages. But students who enroll pick only one of them.

At ILIM School, students learn in all four languages every day.

"I’m not familiar with those kind of programs," Podgorny said. "That would be new to me."

But she also notes that around the world, most children grow up learning several languages at the same time.

How it began

ILIM School was created by Dria Etienne, a mother of three who works in commercial real estate and development. Her husband is in finance, and they travel globally for work and pleasure. Plus his family is Haitian: "They speak Creole. They speak French. They speak Spanish and they speak English," Etienne said.

They enrolled their oldest child in a Mandarin immersion charter school in Charlotte, then in a CMS immersion magnet. During the coronavirus pandemic, she home-schooled her son for a year with a Chinese tutor.

Etienne says she also wants her children to learn with Montessori and Reggio Emilia techniques, which emphasize child-centered exploration. She began talking with other families about pooling their resources to start a small school.

"And then it got much larger very quickly, so now we’re in a 38,000-square-foot space," Etienne said.

Etienne says she tapped her business development background to raise $2 million. Investors included prospective parents and people in Charlotte’s international community.

She got a 10-year lease on the space in a shopping center just off I-485 and Highway 51 in Pineville. And she decided to offer immersion in Mandarin, Arabic, Spanish and English because "these are the four most widely spoken languages in the world, and so when we think about developing a global citizen, to be able to go into these dominant languages for the world, that was important."

Doing immersion in more than two languages is uncommon, experts say, but not unheard of. While she was planning her school Etienne visited a private school in Florida that teaches in three languages while using the Montessori method.

UNC Charlotte’s Department of Languages and Culture Studies signed an agreement with ILIM School to provide unpaid interns. Etienne says she leveraged that to overcome the biggest hurdle for any language immersion school: Finding teachers who are fluent in world languages. Institutions of higher education and nonprofit entities that are affiliated with them are exempted from the limit on H1B visas for specialized occupations.

"We’re a for-profit school with a non-profit arm," Etienne said, and that has allowed her school to recruit teachers by offering the visas.

But UNCC spokesperson Buffie Stephens said Tuesday the university was surprised to learn that Etienne was using the partnership that way. The agreement does not extend to UNCC sponsoring or supporting visas for ILIM teachers, she said.

Etienne looks for native speakers who can teach using Montessori and/or Reggio methods. Because the school is private, the teachers don’t have to be licensed in North Carolina.

Start-up challenges

Etienne had planned to open ILIM in September. She says families had put down deposits for about 100 students, with tuition ranging from $15,500 to $17,500 a year depending on age. But delays renovating the building pushed the opening to late November and some families pulled out.

Currently, the school has 56 children, from toddlers to 8-year-olds, and 17 teachers. Etienne says that means she’s subsidizing operations from the money raised for opening, but she expects to hit her break-even point of 80 students next year.

Etienne eventually hopes to enroll 180 students in preschool and elementary grades, then expand into middle school.

Two of the current students are the children of Jillian Wegner, who teaches in the UNCC Languages and Culture Studies program. Wegner speaks German, Spanish and English, and had already started her daughter in a Spanish immersion public school. She switched when ILIM opened.

"And then now she’s been here for two months and she can count to 50 in both Arabic and Mandarin. She says a lot of phrases at home," Wegner said.

Wegner’s 3-year-old son is also at ILIM, and she hopes he’ll pick up four languages even more readily.

"It’s just really neat to kind of hear them play on their own and you’ll pick up different languages," she said. "And again they’re learning multiple alphabets because it’s not — with Arabic and Mandarin it’s not what we’re used to with English and Spanish being the same alphabet."

Will it stick?

Podgorny, the Union County schools language immersion specialist, says the challenge of learning more than one language is good for a child’s brain development.

"The brain is very capable of learning many languages from an early age," she said.

As for what parents can expect long term, that’s a trickier question. The answer, Podgorny says, depends partly on how long children stick with all four languages and how much exposure they get outside of school. At the least, she says, exposing children to the four languages means they’re likely to recognize a wider range of sounds and words.

"There’s exposure, there’s familiarity, and then there’s proficiency," she said. "To be proficient in even two languages is a challenge."

Learning to read and write in four languages is an even bigger challenge, especially given the dramatic differences in the way the four are written. The ILIM School has an array of books, posters, maps and hands-on learning materials that feature all four languages.

The school’s mission also focuses on making children more aware of world cultures. Podgorny says that has value in itself and is part of what drives the language immersion movement.

"I think people are very aware of the power that language can give us," she said, "how it can make us more capable and hopefully more sympathetic and understanding of other cultures."

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Best Buy unveils small-format, ‘digital-first’ store

Best Buy has opened its first-ever, small-format digitally focused store as part of its test of new store models.The 5,000-sq.-ft. store, located in Monroe, N.C., combines a curated selection of Best Buy’s best-in-category products, consultation service areas including and the retailer’s signature Geek Square with technology enhancements.The assortment covers home theater and audio, computing, headphones, wearables, fitness, cell phones, cameras, smart home, small appliances and more. It excludes major appliances a...

Best Buy has opened its first-ever, small-format digitally focused store as part of its test of new store models.

The 5,000-sq.-ft. store, located in Monroe, N.C., combines a curated selection of Best Buy’s best-in-category products, consultation service areas including and the retailer’s signature Geek Square with technology enhancements.

The assortment covers home theater and audio, computing, headphones, wearables, fitness, cell phones, cameras, smart home, small appliances and more. It excludes major appliances and other larger products (with the exception of large TVs). The large items can be purchased on Best Buy’s website and picked up at the Monroe outpost or shopped for at any of Best Buy’s traditional stores in the Charlotte area.

The Monroe store is piloting a “digital-first” shopping experience that encourages customers to shop, get advice and check out digitally. (The retailer noted that, similar to all pilots, it expects to make adjustments along the way.)

Entering the store, shoppers see a 7-foot-tall digital display that explains what’s new and how they can shop the store.

Here are some other features:

Just scan it. The majority of products are primarily on display for customers to see, touch and try out.

When ready to make a purchase, customers can use their phone to scan the QR code on the product and send the order to be picked up at the order pickup counter. This notifies a Best Buy employee, who will then retrieve the product from the store’s backroom and bring it up to the register for the customer to complete the purchase. (In addition, lockers are available for 24/store pick-up orders.)

•Mobile self-checkout. The store has a collection of grab-and-go items such as charging cables, cell phone cases and gift cards. Using the Best Buy app, customers scan the barcode and use the mobile self-checkout option to make a purchase.

•Get expert advice. Customers who need advice will also have the option to shop live with an expert from Best Buy’s virtual store via call, chat or video chat while in the physical store.

“For those shoppers who prefer not to use these digital options, our trusted Blue Shirts will still be available to help just like at any other Best Buy store,” the company stated.

In November 2021, Best Buy said it planned to test several new store models in the Charlotte area as it looks to meet customers’ varied and changing needs. The models include an experiential store in Charlotte that features premium experiences for audio, home theater and luxury appliances, an in-store selection of fitness equipment and a larger Geek Squad services area.

Best Buy is also testing a new outlet format, in Pineville, N.C., that is designed to handle more repairs than a traditional store, including everything from a cracked phone screen to a broken washing machine. It also boasts a massive garage that can handle more car tech installations — ranging from new speakers to remote start systems — than most locations.

[Read More: Best Buy to double outlet store count; four upcoming locations announced]

South Charlotte residents push back on apartment expansion plan

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A push for more housing in south Charlotte is getting pushback from neighbors.Developer Goldberg Companies Inc. proposed adding 212 units to Legacy Arboretum Apartments in south CharlotteNeighbors say the expansion would bring more traffic to an already congested areaThe proposal as it stands would also cut down a significant amount of tree canopyThe developer will take more time to consider community concerns before presenting an updated proposal to city councilGoldberg Companies In...

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A push for more housing in south Charlotte is getting pushback from neighbors.

Developer Goldberg Companies Inc. proposed adding 212 units to Legacy Arboretum Apartments in south Charlotte

Neighbors say the expansion would bring more traffic to an already congested area

The proposal as it stands would also cut down a significant amount of tree canopy

The developer will take more time to consider community concerns before presenting an updated proposal to city council

Goldberg Companies Inc., an Ohio-based developer, wants to add more than 200 units to Legacy Arboretum Apartments off Pineville-Matthews Road that would nearly double the number of residents who live there.

Kevin MacVean, the attorney representing Goldberg, told the city council in last week's zoning meeting his client is considering input from residents.

Longtime neighbors say that will bring more traffic to an already congested area. Tom Seddon describes the commute in front of Providence High School and nearby Elizabeth Lane Elementary as a nightmare during the school year.

“You’ve got one thing backing up into another thing, backing into another thing,” Seddon said. “Like you do here where one school hits another school and hits another school then hits a really busy intersection in Matthews.”“You’ve got one thing backing up into another thing, backing into another thing,” Seddon said. “Like you do here where one school hits another school and hits another school then hits a really busy intersection in Matthews.”

His daughter attended Elizabeth Lane. He’s lived in the area for 10 years and says the drive from his home to the high school takes two minutes during the summer, but it’s a 20-minute drive in the fall.

Goldberg’s plans would also take away tree canopy in the area, which Seddon says goes against the city’s goal to preserve the environment.

“In the 2040 Plan it is one of the key things is to preserve the natural environment and integrate that into the built environment,” he said.

The developer has adjusted its original proposal, reducing the total number of projected units from 500 to 478. Seddon says that’s not enough.

“I guess it’s a nice sign they appear that they need to listen,” he said. “I’m not sure that they’ve listened hard enough just yet.”

The attorney representing the developer did say it's willing to cooperate with the community at last week’s zoning hearing.

Councilman Ed Driggs recently told residents the developer will also take more time to consider community concerns.

The earliest council can vote on the new proposal is Sept. 19.

Public Records for Week of July 28, 2022

Land TransfersThe following land transfers were filed with the Davie Register of Deeds, listed by parties involved, acreage, location and deed stamps purchased, with $2 representing $1,000. nting $1,000.– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, .62 acre, Fulton.– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, tracts.– Easystreet Properties to DME Elite Properties, 12.73 acres, Milling Road, $712.– Thomas Murphy Hooker Jr. ...

Land Transfers

The following land transfers were filed with the Davie Register of Deeds, listed by parties involved, acreage, location and deed stamps purchased, with $2 representing $1,000. nting $1,000.

– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, .62 acre, Fulton.

– James F. Patton and Kimberly P. Allgood, co-trustees to JK Properties, tracts.

– Easystreet Properties to DME Elite Properties, 12.73 acres, Milling Road, $712.

– Thomas Murphy Hooker Jr. to Carolina S. Harrell and James L. Springer Jr., 5.01 acres, Peoples Creek Road, Advance, $1,400.

– Scott A. Jackson and Heather L. Jackson to Joseph Michael Robinson, Brianna Irene Lookabill and Amber Joy Link, 1 acre, Pineville Road, Farmington, $260.

– HPA II Borrower 2019-1 to Eugene Wayne Faircloth and Heather Nicole Johnson, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance, $700.

– Michael T. Munley to Gerald L. Blout and Carolyn S. Blout, 1 villa, Oak Valley, Advance, $890.

– Stephanie Moore Boyce to Jacob Neil and Holly Whitfield, .95 acre, Shady Grove Township, $652.

– Victoria Pless to Joyce B. Bullard, tract, Farmington Township, $356.

– Third Generation Homes to Malcolm Marks and Sharon Marks, 1 lot, Myers Ridge, $1,050.

– Comfort Quality Homes to Aaron L. Hopping and Dannielle C. Hopping, .47 acre, Mocksville Township, $470.

– Charles A. Elmore and Linda D. Elmore to Kevin Mabe and Sherry Mabe, .8 acre, $40.

– Jay S. Matlock to David Lee Dodder and Melissa Dawn Dodder, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance, $900.

– Sherman Desi Arnold to Michael Seamon and Virginia Seamon, 1 lot, Craftwood, Mocksville, $150.

– D.R. Horton Inc. to Kathy Lynn Atkins and Debra Jane Parsons, 1 lot, Highland Place, $564.

– D.R. Horton Inc. to Ruben Gallegos and Christine Melissa Gallegos, 1 lot, Highland Place, $624.

– Earnhardt and Russ Builders to Sue Earnhardt, 1 lot, Jerusalem Township.

– Earnhardt and Russ Builders to Sue Earnhardt, tracts.

– Dalton Realty to Clarence L. Dalton III and Alice P. Dalton, 2.4 acres, Fulton Township.

– Anthony J. Cameron Sr. and Robin Elaine Cameron to Anthony J. Cameron II, 1 lot, Farmington Township.

– Reverse Mortgage Funding to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, 1 lot, Fieldcrest Subdivision.

– Wilmington Savings Fund Society to Rosa Elva Santiago Martinez and Alejandro Mejia Bustos, 1 lot, Fieldcrest Subdivision, $230.

– Angela Warner, trustee to Cameron Warner, part of 2 lots, Mocksville Township.

– BR 2016 Cornatzer Road to BR 2016 Cornatzer Road DST, tract, Cornatzer Road, Advance, $22,200.

– Jeffrey Eaton and Ann Eaton to Larry Preston Dishmond, 1 lot, Clarksville Township, $613.

– Vanessa Berrios to Anibal Tomas Pestamo-Aguilo, 1 lot, Oak Valley, Advance.

– Wanda Jean Bailey and Bruce Bailey, Mitchell Loren Wolford and Carla L. Wolford, and Michael Lawrence Wolford, and Dale Lee Wolford to Sigifredo Acevedo Gama and Jazmine Acevedo, tracts, Jerusalem Township, $376.

– Mitchell L. Link and Stephanie Link to MCM Holdings, 1 lot, Jerusalem Township, $216.

– Angela Dawn Tedder to Angela Dawn Tedder and Jason Christopher Tedder, 3 lots, Woodland, Mocksville Township.

– Brenda Joyner Legg to Angela Dawn Tedder, 1 villa, Milling Way, Mocksville.

– Zoobie Holdings to Michael H. Forman and Stephanie T. Foreman, trustees, .87 acre, Farmington Township, $2,750.

– Julianne O. Hanes to Joseph M. Miles and Jane V. Miles, 10.13 acres, $530.

– James C. Winchester IV to FKH SRF Propco K., 1 lot, Redland Way, $845.

– Christopher Andrew Vest and Stephanie Myers Vest to Kenneth S. White, .52 acre, $30.

– Grace Smith Hoots to Jamie Richard White and Wendi Jones White,.25 acre, Calahaln Township.

– Grace Smith Hoots to Jamie R. White and Melissa W. Hill, tract, Calahaln Township.

– Jacob Nisley to Ragland Holdings, 1.78 acres, Calahaln Township, $490.

– Bobby Joe McDaniels and Deborah S. McDaniels to Sujit Naik, tract, Pineville Road, Farmington, $440.

– Marklin Family Properties to Neil R. Menius, 3 lots, Mocksville Township, $40.

– Barry Dean Hauser to Barry Dean Hauser and Kristy Diane Owens, 1.65 acres, US 64 E., Mocksville.

– Charles S. King and Chantal King to ABCS Holdings, tracts, Mocksville Township, $374.

– Braxton Real Estate and Development to D.R. Horton Inc., tracts, Highland Place, $2,697.

– Lena Renee Makas and Jerry Wayne Makas to Carlos Villatoro Bonilla, tracts, Jerusalem Township, $276.

– Jeffrey Sneed and Kimberly Sneed to Michael Texidor and Melony Texidor, 1 lot, Copperfield Drive, Mocksville, $940.

– House Farmers to H4 Homes Custom Builders, 1 lot, Eagles Landing, $70.

– Third Generation Homes to Ashton Joyner and Samuel W. Joyner, 1 lot, Myers Ridge, $1,050.

– WJH to Simone Valcourt and William Thomas Hoyle,1 lot, Elisha Creed Ridge, Mocksville, $467.

– Carol Jean Griffin to Phillip D. Allen and Ericka Allen, tracts, Jerusalem Township, $60.

– WJH to Rajeshkumar Patel and Shitalben Patel, 1 lot, Elisha Creek Ridge, Mocksville, $490.

– Matthew J. Carver and Holly E. Carver to Clayburn D. Watson and Sabrina R. Watson, 1 lot, Villas at Lake Louise, $900.

– S&A Estate Services to MCM Holdings SC, 1 lot, Jerusalem Township, $199.

– James E. Neagle IV and Briana D. Neagle to Chad Groover and Tara Lynn Thomas, 1 lot, Summer Hill Farm, $850.

– Clyde H. Howell Jr. (and as administrator of estate of Callie Julia Maud Howell), Donna H. Foster, and Jerry Lynn Smith to Matthew Brelia and Shelley Brelia, tracts, Brambelwood Lane, $49.

– Brian Nicolay to FKH SFR Propco K., 1 lot, Kinderton Village, Bermuda Run, $840.

– Sandra Jean Daniel DePuew (and as executor of estate of Jean Wallace Daniel) and Michael W. DePuew to Joshua P. Draughn, and Ashley D. Burgess, tract, Jerusalem Township, $430.

– DR Horton to Shanice N. Covington and Desmond T. King, 1 lot, Highland Place, $638.

– Daniel B. Webb and Barbara Webb, and Diane W. Hawkins and Milton Francis Hawkins to Diane W. Hawkins, tracts.

– Michael Tyrone Conner and Ryan Ervin Conner to Sita Ildiko Ciudad-Real, 1 lot, Hungers Pointe, $600.

– Karen T. Monger to Steven L. Sexton and Marcia G. Sexton, 2 lots, Whip-O-Will Land & Cattle, Farmington Township, $1,700.

– Dominick Anthony Genoves and Sara Mae Genovese to Christopher Rogers and Sharon Rogers, tract, Pineville Road, Farmington, $30.

– TWP PCP Mocks Retail to Daniel J. Reynolds and Beth A. Reynolds, 1.63 acres, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville, $6,246.

– Kyle J. Wooten and Andrea C. Wooten to OP Gold, 1 lot, Garden Valley, Mocksville, $531.

– Golden Properties to Ronald James Plemmons Jr. and Crystal Delaney Plemmons, 1 lot, Village of Maisonnettes, Bermuda Run, $650.

– James Harris Hudgins Jr. and Paige Hudgins, Jerry Charles Hudgins and Renee Hudgins, and Jennifer H. Burnett to Carmen Y. Radson,1 lot, Turnberry at Boxwood Village, Mocksville, $496.

– Benjamin James Branch to Claudia Denise Brown, 1 lot, Bermuda Run West, $1,160.

Arrests

July 22: Kevin Isaiah Bowick, 22, of Durham, failure to appear in court; Telly Edward Dean, 45, of Yadkinville, trespassing; Lisa Kay Manning, 38, of US 601 S., Mocksville, trespassing; Willard Ray Martin III, 47, of Glenwood Road, Mocksville, violation of court order; Mickey Wayne Roseman Jr., 27, of Cummings Lane, Mocksville, interfering with jail fire system.

July 21: Justin Lee Waller, 33, of Flat Rock Road, Mocksville, non-support of child; Larry Shawn West, 41, of Lancelot Lane, Mcoksville, domestic violence prevention order violation.

July 20: Joseph Linn Reid, 31, of Mr. Henry Road, Mocksville, failure to appear in court.

July 19: Shawn Eric Baughman-Skrabut, 33, of Mocksville, breaking and entering; Tabitha Anne Spillman, 40, of Hobson Drive, Mocksville, assault.

July 18: Jonathan Wayne Nix, 34, of Calvin Lane, Mocksville, failure to appear in court.

Sheriff’s Office

The following are from Davie County Sheriff’s Office reports.

July 23: noise complaint, James Way, Bermuda Run; trespassing, US 601 S., Mocksville; suspicious activity, War Eagle Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, S. Clement St., Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Watt St., Cooleemee; trespassing, Yadkin Valley Road, Advance; larceny, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksvill; disturbance, Madison Road, Mocksville; suspiciuos activity, US 158, Bermuda Run; harassment, SM Whitt Drive, Mocksville; harassment, US 601 S., Mocksville; harassment, Watt St., Cooleemee; disturbance, Hollow Hill Court, Mocksville.

July 22: disturbance, US 601 S., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Marklin Ave., Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 158, Bermuda Run; damage to property, McAllister Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, NC 801 N., Mocksville; fraud, Orchard Park Drive, Bermuda Run; suspicious activity, Cornatzer Road, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; domestic assist, NC 801 N., Mocksville; larceny, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; fraud, Willhave Drive, Mocksville; fraud, Orchard Park Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, River Drive, Bermuda Run; fraud, Turrentine Church Road, Mocksville; trespassing, Shady Lane, Advance; runaway, Arnold Palmer Drive, Advance; suspicious activity, John Crotts Road, Mocksville; domestic assist, Wildwood Lane, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Glenwood Road, Mocksville; damage to property, Green St., Mocksville; assault, Dalton Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cornatzer Road, Advance; larceny, Sunset Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Baltimore Road, Advance; suspicious activity, Yadkin Valley Road, Advance.

July 21: noise complaint, Sunset Drive, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, NC 801 N., Mocksville; larceny, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 64 W., Mocksville; larceny, US 601 N., Mocksville; assault, Village Medical Drive, Mocksville; fraud, Boxwood Village Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Oakmont Drive, Advance; fraud, Cedar Creek Road, Mocksville; harassment, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; domestic assist, NC 801 S., Cooleemee; suspicious activity, Nebbs Trail, Mocksville; suspicious activity, S. Salisbury St., Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 158, Advance; domestic disturbance, Swicegood St., Mocksville.

July 20: disturbance, Michaels Road, Mocksville; harassment, Carter Lane, Mocksville; fraud, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; larceny, Ford Trail, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Cornatzer Road, Mocksville; trespassing, Lagle Lane, Mocksville; disturbance, Clark Road, Mocksville; damage to property, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; larceny, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; trespassing, Deacon Way, Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 601 N., Mocksville; larceny, NC 801 S., Advance; disturbance, Camden Point Court, Mocksville; harassment, Ginny Lane, Advance; suspicious activity, White Oak Lane, Mocksville; larceny, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; assault, Madison Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, NC 801 S., Advance; damage to property, Ollie Harkey Road, Mocksville; fraud, Admill Way, Mocksville; damage to property, War Eagle Drive, Mocksville; fraud, Danner Road, Mocksville; larceny, Boxwood Church Road, Mocksville; damage to property, North Forke Drive, Bermuda Run; harassment, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Clark Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; burglary, Yadkinville Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Southwood Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Valley Road, Mocksville.

July 18: domestic disturbance, Fieldwood Drive, Advance; suspicious activity, Oak Valley Blvd., Advance; domestic disturbance, Avon St., Mocksville; assault, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; domestic assist, Windward Circle, Mocksville; harassment, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, NC 801 N., Advance; larceny, Valley Road, Mocksville; larceny, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; harassment, Deacon Way, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Park Drive, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Calvin Lane, Mocksville; domestic assist, James Road, Advance; harassment, Willow Creek Lane, Mocksville; damage to property, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; domestic assist, Government Center Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Watt St., Cooleemee; suspicious activity, Court Square, Mocksville.

July 17: suspicious activity, Gladstone Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Cemetery St., Mocksville; suspicious activity, US 601 S., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Stone Wood Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Farmington Road, Mocksville; larceny, S. Salisbury St., Mocksville; suspicious activity, Interstate Drive, Mocksville; assault, Cemetery St., Mocksville; assault, S. Salisubry St., Mocksville; larceny, Center Circle, Mocksville; disturbance, US 158, Mocksville; noise complaint, Hobson Drive, Mocksville; suspicioius activity, Cooper Creek Drive, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Pointe House Lane, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Legion Hut Road, Mocksville; suspicious activity, Miller Road, Mocksville; domestic disturbance, Northridge Court, Mocksville; larceny, US 158, Bermuda Run.

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